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(Solved) - Paging file on secondary drive??

(9 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by 6card
  • Latest reply from germ-x
  • Topic Viewed 1594 times

6card
6card
Posts: 357

I self installed a secondary drive on my new desktop. Somehow it came up with a paging file.

Do I want/need a paging file when I only want to use it for personal stuff ... no operating files.

Does this make sense?

Can I simply delete that file?

Posted 2 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Without a paging file your system will crash. You can reduce it to e.g. 1GB, but you will need some of it. If you look into Resource Monitor > Memory tab you see a little black graph on the right bottom (hard faults). That shows you the paging activity of your system.

If you have a lot of RAM (4GB or more) there will not be a lot of activity. But some programs will trigger page faults even if there is plenty of available RAM.

PS: I have no idea though how the pagefile got to your secondary drive.

Posted 2 years ago
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6card
6card
Posts: 357

Thanks for the reply whs, but not clear ...

I am referring to the pagefile on the secondary D:\ drive ... it has a pagefile with 2.9GB.

This is in addition to the pagefile on my root drive C:\ with 1.9GB.

Do I need the page file on the D drive? I have no intent to dump the pagefile on the C:\ drive.

six

Posted 2 years ago
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Xhi
Xhi
Posts: 6298

It may be advantageous to have that additional page file on the secondary drive. You may get a performance improvement by doing so. It has to do with the Speed Boost capability built in to Vista and beyond. This article, The Page File, SuperFetch, and ReadyBoost will be helpful in explaining it. You should also be able to glean from this article how to set the pagefile not to use the second drive if that is what you want.

Posted 2 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

6card, to tell you the truth, I am a bit puzzled. I have no clue how this pagefile bit would have gotten on your second drive. If you have 1.9GB on your C, that should suffice. But before you delete anything, tell us how much RAM you have.

Posted 2 years ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Check the DATA on both PAGEFILE.SYS's. They both can't be active at the same time.

Is that 'Secondary' your new boot drive? Did you install Windows to it and then use the old drive as a data drive? If so, you forget to remove that file from it.

If one has an old data or timestamp vs. the other, you can delete it.

Irv S.

Posted 2 years ago
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6card
6card
Posts: 357

whs, you think YOU are puzzled!! I find this to be boggling! But I am learning.

BTW, I am running WIN7

To answer some questions ...

I have 2GB ram.

Time stamp C:\ pagefile is 2011SEP30. On D:\ is 2011FEB12. The latter seems to be inactive, to me.

C:\ is my boot drive. [I think I understand what the "boot" drive is]

My intent was that the secondary was to be for data and and the root was the operating drive. I think I moved stuff around without fully knowing what I was doing and/or why.

If someone suggested to adjust the page file size I could do it for the C:\ drive but I don't have the foggiest where to adjust it on my D:\ drive.

six

Posted 2 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

With the 2GB of RAM, you should be OK with the 1.9GB of pagefile. I would augment it a bit ( to e.g. 2.2GB) because else you may not get a full memory dump the day you run into a BSOD (the pagefile is where the memory dump is stored). This stray pagefile on D: I would just ignore.

Posted 2 years ago
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germ-x
germ-x
Posts: 5310

You can turn the pagefile off on your "D" drive if you want.
Start > control panel > System >
When the System window opens then click on System Protection on the left side pane / panel.
A system properties box will open > then click on the advanced tab > Then under performance click on settings > There you will see another advanced tab, click on it.
This opens another box and the last item is virtual memory which shows your total paging file size.
Click on the change button.
Once there you will see what is allocated for each drive and at the bottom of the page you will see three numbers Minimum allowed, Recommended, Currently allocated.
If you Uncheck the little box at the top of the page it highlights all changable settings including your drives and amount of paging file size.
You can shut your "D" drive off if you want or make any other changes you think best suites your system.
You can also allow windows to control the file size.
Somehow sometime someone turned your "D" drive on, just click on it to highlight the drive then just below there are two buttons, tick on the one for "no paging file" and your done.

Posted 2 years ago
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