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Overheating Problem

(22 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by Hawk22
  • Latest reply from ProstheticHead
  • Topic Viewed 1758 times

Hawk22
Posts: 18

I have been having issues with overheating since I built this new computer. I have been monitoring my temperatures, and found one of my graphics cards is heating to about 80-90C, and freezing my computer. I have no idea where to go from here.

I have 2 video cards (BFG 280s), in a NZXT Tempest computer case (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811146047)

I really am looking for any suggestions how to fix this problem. I am looking into a new side fan for this case, and hope to have suggestions for that as well. If anyone has had good luck with a certain fan for overheating with this case (or a similar case), please let me know.

If anyone has any other suggestions what to do, I'd appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

Anyone have any ideas? Please.

Posted 5 years ago
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brad
brad
Posts: 288

Does the card make a funny noise when its on?

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

No, nothing makes any funny noises.

I am thinking it might even be some settings for my nvidia controler.

I noticed one setting said "set physX GPU Acceleration" (for NVIDIA Control Panel), and I had that to disabled. I enabled it, but haven't run enough tests to see if this will help.

Any other suggestions would be appreciated. Nothing is worse than crashing out of intense online multiplayer matches...

Posted 5 years ago
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brad
brad
Posts: 288

Normal load temperatures should be about 70-80c. According to BFG and NVIDIA if the temp is around or above 100c it means hat the card is defective and should be RMA'd. Right now there are a lot of 280s that overheating.

The settings in the NVIDIA control panel should not affect the temp of your card.

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

Thanks for your help Brad.

I've never seen my card get 100c ever, but it does seem to be overheating and freezing. Does it do that at 90c or 100c?

What is the best thing to do then? Should I get a better intake fan on the side (draws air next to the cards)? Should I even update the front fan that pulls air towards the front intake of the actual video cards?

I've already cleaned up the cords inside the computer, and made sure all the fans were working.

Posted 5 years ago
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brad
brad
Posts: 288

90 is a pretty high temp and is most likely the reason it is freezing. The first thing I would like to know is the size of your power supply and its model( name etc.) before we make you spend any money. :)

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

Heh, thanks. It is an OCZ 1000W. It was recommended to me for SLI use. I have proper power cords (1 6 and 1 8 pin) in each of the Graphics Cards.

Posted 5 years ago
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brad
brad
Posts: 288

Okay just making sure it was not a power problem.
Looking at the design of the case it could possibly be that your fan is picking up heat from one(or if you have more) of your hard drives. Is there a HD close to the overheating card?

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

There are two hard drive cases, one on the same level as the graphics cards, and one on the level below them (but both on the front side of the tower). Both my HDDs are in the case below the graphics cards. It is possible that the air flow still manages to enter the lower card, but I doubt it. I turned a fan on which takes air into the top HDD case, which I hope will flow right into the graphics cards...

After I did this, I did notice the lower G.C. getting slightly hotter than before, but still below 75C or so. The main G.C is still getting pretty hot...

Maybe I just need a more powerful fan on the front to suck more air into the G.C. intake?

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Hawk, since you built this PC yourself, is there a chance you could switch to watercooling. Running at those high temps all the time does not sound very healthy to me. For testing, I would open the sides of the box and run it for a while with a big room fan next to it. If that still leaves the temps up, then adding a fan here and there inside the box may not buy you much. Also, did you overclock any of the units?

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

I haven't overclocked, and don't really plan to.

I do have a fan on the side of the tower (pulls air in next to G.C's, but not into the actual cards' intakes), but it doesn't push much air. BFG (the maker of my GTX280's) says that running at those temps shouldn't even be causing the problems... The rep. said under 100C is safe. Now, I agree with you that the life of the unit will be limited in the long run, but I'm only concerned with the immediate problems for now. Water cooling seems a little too risky and too difficult for me right now. I love the idea, but don't really have any remaining budget for it...

I am hesitant to get a new fan for the side, since I am not even sure that will fix the problem. Maybe a strong intake fan in the front is the way to go. But maybe it is just from a faulty card. I am going to try testing each card tomorrow individually.

Maybe the BFG rep. is right and the freezing is being caused by something else. He suggested troubleshooting with a BFG tech. rep. I'll report what is found out there as well. Thanks again for all the help.

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Do you realize that 100C is boiling water (212F). I would not think that this is tolerable at all. Usually they say that 70C (168F) is the maximum one should allow. My systems (including the quad core) usually run between 40 and 50C. Looking at the data you posted, I would think you have to do something more dramatic than an extra little fan. (maybe ice packs - LOL).

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

So are you saying that buying two strong fans for cooling would be a waste of money? What other options do I have (other than water cooling)?

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

I don't know whether that is a waste of money. But if a big external fan with the panels open does not help, I don't know how much good a couple of small internal fans can do. Maybe you need better heat sinks and better paste. Here are a few interesting articles that you may want to study:

http://www.dansdata.com/coolercomp.htm

http://www.tomshardware.com/re.....,1053.html

http://www.xbitlabs.com/articl.....alman.html

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

I haven't tried the big external fan with the side open yet, though I'm sure this will keep things fairly cool... It doesn't explain much of a solution, however. What I mean is, I'd like to be able to keep my tower door shut most the time :-)

Thanks for the articles. I have a good CPU cooler with the best thermal paste I could buy on Newegg. My CPU actually stays pretty cool... I am gonna look into a better cooling system for my video cards. I am hoping there will be something that can sit in between the cards, and cool them that way. Like, a cooler designed for SLI'ed video cards. If anyone knows of such a thing, I'd be really happy to hear about it. I am pretty positive my problem is that the air flow is constricted from the crammed dual video cards SLI'ed...

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Hawk22, in all of this discussion I don't see mention of which fans you have and how they are running. The key to good cooling is airflow. Based only on the specs, that NZXT Tempest case should have plenty. There are 2 120mm intake fans on the front and 2 140mm exhaust fans on the top. The side and rear fans make for 6 total case fans, plus the PSU will have a fan as well. Do you have all of these fans installed and running? Are they variable speed fans, or fixed? Either way, are they running at high speed?

Another key to airflow is the balance of intake and exhaust and elimination of recirculation. The 2 front fans should be intakes and the 2 top fans exhaust. This will cause air to flow from front to back and bottom to top. Hot air rises, so top exhaust is good. The rear fan can assist with exhaust. I have never been a fan of side intake fans because they move air transverse to the normal airflow and set up turbulence. I would suggest that you experiment with leaving the side fan unplugged which still allows cool air to be drawn in as a result of low pressure. Finally, the PSU fan is oddly situated at the bottom of the case. If the fan is facing up, it is drawing air down near the back of the case in opposition to the other airflow. If the fan faces down, it might have less of an adverse affect.

As always, you want slightly more exhaust pressure than intake pressure, which is another reason to leave the side fan off. Finally, the only way to be sure of what cooling is good cooling is by experimenting with different fans on or off, running at different speeds, and measuring the resulting temperatures.

Posted 5 years ago
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ProstheticHead
ProstheticHead
Posts: 3281

Hi Hawk22. Is there anything obstructing the exhaust vents at the rear?

My lower 8800gts card runs a few degrees hotter than the top, due (I think) to being pretty close the the bottom of the case. I've tried a 220mm fan on the side panel, mounted on a mesh grill. This made very little difference, either pushing air in, or sucking it out so I'd say Water cooling would be a good option for you (Assuming your card isn't faulty).

Also, some pretty cool visual effects can be gained with UV reacive coolant. Maybe that might help sway your decision. :)

Posted 5 years ago
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Hawk22
Posts: 18

Obstructions are limited, since I'd tied all the wires down, and left enough space for the fans to push air adequately.

I am looking into getting 3 pin to 4 pin converters, so I can actually run all the fans on the tower. I am noticing a conflict with the power-supply on the bottom, next to the lower video card. There isn't really enough room down there for much airflow at all. Also, the hot air from the hard drives is flowing right into the intake for the graphics cards as well (especially the bottom one), and I don't see a fix for this at all. All I can hope for is that with all the fans operating the airflow will be enough to fix this problem.

I hope running all the fans at once will fix my problem, otherwise liquid cooling is my only option, which would be pretty tough to implement at this stage.

Posted 5 years ago
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ProstheticHead
ProstheticHead
Posts: 3281

I use a Zalman 6 channel fan controller for most of my case fans. Not the perfect solution I know, but with lots of fans running noise can be an issue and it's great to be able to turn it down as and when.
The PSU at the bottom of the case would be a worry. I know my PSU gets pretty hot during operation, and a lot of hot components close together is bad news.
Would it be difficult to test with the PSU outside of the case?

Posted 5 years ago
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