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not yet geek - how to become a geek

(18 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by charlie999vvv
  • Latest reply from StringJunky
  • Topic Viewed 620 times

charlie999vvv
Posts: 13

I enjoy computers. I can do very basic troubleshooting, i.e computer running slowly (killing programs and services running in background), by finding and implementing tips found online(e.g howtogeek) etc. However I have no actual understanding of what's really going on in a computer and I know there are so many areas of computing.

Is there any book anyone can recommend that will give a basic in depth understanding of different important areas to make me more knowledgeable. Any comments please, not specially book related will be appreciated!

Thank you.

Posted 1 year ago
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Tutaha
Posts: 13

Why not start with system tweaks-----just learning to modify the settings on your devices would be a good start...

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
Posts: 2454

Hi Charlie

The best book for the job is " Upgrading and Repairing PC's" by Scott Mueller. What this guy doesn't know about computers hardware-wise and in function probably isn't worth knowing. He holds a library most manuals of every PC component ever made. It is a weighty tome of about 1300 pages but as readable as a book like this can be...I've had three editions.

Here's an Ebook link: http://books.google.co.uk/book.....1UGe9IuLkC

here's a bit of video of Scott: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRW7MmKWLk4

Here's his website: http://forum.scottmueller.com/

Tony

Posted 1 year ago
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bubbatie1
Posts: 1322

Also you need a pocket pen holder ! plastic preferred ! rofl .

In reality............ stick around here is a great way to start too ! the senior members here have tried,tested, & review "geek" stuff ! personally i have learned a ton from the mods & many senior members!

Posted 1 year ago
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vistual
Posts: 3135

+1 bubbatie1

stick around here. its a great way to start too !
thats the truth!

@Tony, bookmarked! thanks!

Posted 1 year ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Tony, bookmarked his site. Very interesting, not seen that one before :)

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
Posts: 2454

LH and Vis

If I was a pc repairer or builder he would be my guru. :)

Tony

Posted 1 year ago
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vistamike
Posts: 10945

Yep, very interesting indeed

And don't forget Charles; http://www.blackviper.com/

Mike

Posted 1 year ago
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vistual
Posts: 3135

@Mike ++1 ...
my first tweaking was done via bvs guides
: )

which i learned about ........... wait for it ...............
here!

Posted 1 year ago
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Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

And guess who from :)

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
Posts: 6259

One thing you could do is 'bone up' on how the OS works. A lot of valuable data is on the web for reading, such as the boot process, NTFS internals, Registry workings, etc. Some good utilities that look at processes would also help. Learning how to decrypt the Event Viewer entries as well.

Best way though is via learning to get information and solve problems that randomly hit you. Nothing beats experience other than learning and sometimes it isn't clear which comes first.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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charlie999vvv
Posts: 13

Thanks to all for your response. I've pre-ordered the latest version of " Upgrading and Repairing PC's" by Scott Mueller. Now doing my rounds for a belated birthday present to fund it!

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
Posts: 2454

Charlie

Good for you. :)

If you understand the main bulk of of the functioning of a pc from this book and apply it where you can you'll have technician level understanding. Skim over the older technologies and component technical data if they don't interest you at the moment and focus on the principles instead. You can browse the component data as and when you need it. You can use this book on several levels. When you've read it to your heart's content it should become your go-to data reference. It wouldn't surprise me if you get two three editions in a row providing Scott's still writing them. Also, read the chapters in the order you fancy and that seems logical to YOU.

Write back with a review sometime...I'd be interested to read about your thoughts on it.

Tony

Posted 1 year ago
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charlie999vvv
Posts: 13

@Tony. Thanks for your tips. From seeing a preview online it does seem to contain quite a bit of history which might not always be necessary. As you say I don't need to read every word!

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
Posts: 2454

@Charlie

When I was reading them I learnt the principles, practicalities and the latest technology at the time because that's what was relevant. Make no mistake, Scott is a hard-core hardware geek and the books reflect that. What he gives you is an understanding up to where hardware meets software and the interaction between the two; much more from an engineer's side of the fence rather than a programmer's. His Upgrading and Repairing books are like a 6 course dinner! :D The only trouble with learning computing is you have to KEEP ON it learning it as it progresses relentlessly or you fall out the loop like I've done now with the hardware. The book should satisfy your curiosity anyway and take you as deep as you might choose to go. You'll definitely not find it more clearly or comprehensively written about anywhere else.

After all this you might focus on Windows itself and how it's structured. Then you really can set your pc up how you want it.

Tony

Posted 1 year ago
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charlie999vvv
Posts: 13

Thanks for your interest. Shame the book seems to be (from what your saying) very hardware orientated. It would be good I suppose to give basics about programming, linux and other things which I hear about and have no good idea about. (I guess prob need individual books etc about each of these topics). Would welcome any other tips of good books.

Posted 1 year ago
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warlock
Posts: 4100

@charlie999vvv, Your not going to learn everything at once. And, your never going to learn it all. Pick a topic and start with that.

Edit: Did you look through this sticky?

http://www.howtogeek.com/forum.....replies=41

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
Posts: 2454

@Charlie

The road to understanding computing is very wide and very long. I agree with warlock.

Posted 1 year ago
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