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Microsoft Security Essentials Loses AV-Test Certificate

(13 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by Straspey
  • Latest reply from LadyFitzgerald
  • Topic Viewed 410 times

Straspey
Straspey
Posts: 556

From Neowin:

Every two months, AV-Test takes a look at popular antivirus software and security suites and tests them in several ways. In their latest test which was performed on Windows 7 during September and October, Microsoft Security Essentials didn't pass the test to achieve certification. Although that may not sound that impressive, Microsoft's program was the only one which didn't receive AV-Test's certificate. For comparison, the other free antivirus software, including Avast, AVG and Panda Cloud did.

There are three categories where the programs receive points: protection, repair and usability. When added all up, the software needs to have at least 11 out of 18 points to pass the test. Security Essentials only got 10,5 points, which brings up the question: What's the cause?

It seems that Security Essentials failed to recognize enough zero-day threats with detection rates of only 69% in September and 64% in October, where the average is 89%. The rest of the scores remain largely unchanged when compared to the previous test. It's only honest to mention though that most of the programs tested scored lower than in May and June.

The full article, complete with graphics and charts, can be read at the link below:

http://www.neowin.net/news/mic.....ertificate

Posted 1 year ago
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Xhi
Xhi
Posts: 6298

Hmmm, then why aren't millions of posts somewhere about all the viruses folks have been getting who use MSE??? IMNSHO, the whole virus industry is 90% scam and 10% protection. Having never had a virus since 1997 when I used to use Floppy drives on College campuses I have found that most computer problems are self caused or Malware caused, not caused by viruses zero-day or not. MSE remains, in my mind, easy to operate, small footprint, less interference and sufficient, for most common users.

Posted 1 year ago
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vistamike
vistamike
Posts: 10945

MSE, size 3 shoe, runs quietly in the background and finds what it needs to. Never had a problem on all the machines I have it on. (own and client).
However I do run SAS pro and Mbam as well to be sure.

Mike

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

I did have a problem once with MSE where I got 2 infections that SAS found. But not since then. I do prefer NIS but have to wait until I can pick up a free copy.

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
StringJunky
Posts: 2454

"A zero-day (or zero-hour or day zero) attack or threat is an attack that exploits a previously unknown vulnerability in a computer application, meaning that the attack occurs on "day zero" of awareness of the vulnerability.[1] This means that the developers have had zero days to address and patch the vulnerability. Zero-day exploits (actual software that uses a security hole to carry out an attack) are used or shared by attackers before the developer of the target software knows about the vulnerability." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-day_attack

There's not a lot one can do about these as they are so cutting edge. As long as they are discovered shortly after and patched I don't think there's much more that can be done unless one gets a really paranoid AV setup that questions every system file altered...does one want to get bugged by security popups every five minutes...no thanks! MSE will continue to be my realtime AV.

Posted 1 year ago
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edmenje
edmenje
Posts: 279

I add Threatfire, which uses heuristics to scan and I run it in addition to MSIE with no hit on the systems. This gives the extra coverage to hopefully catch those zero-day nasties. The freeware version is still available at majorgeeks.com

Posted 1 year ago
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LadyFitzgerald
Posts: 2232

I had problems with Threatfire not playing well with some programs when I tried it a while back. When it crashed my computer and I had to restore from an image, I removed it and never used it again.

It's funny; I saw a link posted recently to a site that supposedly did up to the minute, real life evaluations of free AVs and it showed MSE was only one or two percent shy of the top AVs they listed (all were in the high 80s). Frankly, I don't have too much faith in the commercial reviews of much of anything anymore since the results from reviewer to reviewer can be all over the map and rarely is conducted over a long term. Like Xhi pointed out, if MSE was so bad, there would be a plethora of posts about virus infections while running it. The only two virus infections I ever had on this machine while running MSE was when I was first setting the machine up; SAS picked them up and zapped them. The only thing SAS ever finds is the occasional, low threat supercookie (I get very few of them since, once I learn which sites uses them, I eschew the sites). MBAM never finds anything. So, I'm inclined to think that MSE is doing its job just fine.

Posted 1 year ago
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Lighthouse
Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Used to use Threatfire on several comps, but it got a bit heavy duty, so removed it.

Posted 1 year ago
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StringJunky
StringJunky
Posts: 2454

LH

That's the thing though, if you want a high level of watchfulness from anti-malware that's the price...excessive use of resources. You can't have your cake... :)

I got dubious about it's too frequent updating and gave it up, quite a while ago now.

Posted 1 year ago
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Lighthouse
Lighthouse
Posts: 13598

Yeah. I swore by Avira free for years. That too got heavy, so switched to MSE. It seems to work ok.

Posted 1 year ago
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Straspey
Straspey
Posts: 556

Just for the record (since I was the one who started this thread) -

I have been using MSE for a few years now and will continue to do so, happily.

In conjunction with that, I also run SUPERAntiSpyware and Malwarebytes Antimalware and WinPatrol.

I find this, along with my firewall, router and the "NoScript" add-on for Firefox, to provide me with adequate safety.

We also use the same combination on my wife's desktop and laptop, and it has alos proven to be effective.

Posted 1 year ago
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Superevil
Superevil
Posts: 175

It doesn't matter what antivirus you use (unless it's McAfee, then shame on you). The best AV is common sense.

Posted 1 year ago
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LadyFitzgerald
Posts: 2232

@ Superevil. You are so right about McAfee and common sense!

Posted 1 year ago
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