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(Solved) - Installed Win7 on partion. Made too small. How can I change that?

(47 posts)
  • Started 4 years ago by baldeguy56
  • Latest reply from baldeguy56
  • Topic Viewed 6369 times

baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

Hi everybody. recently I made a partion of 40gb to install Win7 RC. Now, I want to get more involved with this OS. What method is the best and safest way to migrate my files onto a new and larger partion, say1050GB, install Win7 on it, then to reclaim the 40GB to Vista. Don't quite know how I did this and shouldn't be a problem, but Vista is the default OS (D) and Win7 is listed as C. Or is there an easier method for the partion to create? I already have 1/2 of the 40GB used and I'm not really on Win7, as yet. Could you please help me to accomplish this? Thanks...Garry

Posted 4 years ago
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mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

Would suggest you install Partition Wizard HERE. Free and outstanding.

Then you can resize the partitions to suit.

Or create a partition to the required size for either OS and clone to this custom partition.

If you only want to copy/clone data files to the new partition,the easiest way might be to clone the whole lot-remove everything which isnt needed (Windows and Program Files etc- one simple delete each).All this should be achieved in 5-10 minutes as long as the system isnt active of course.

Then work on the Doc and Settings Folder to extract the required data files,also painless, as all will be in folders.

You can also slide the partitions around in a dummy run,to see whether everything will be feasible.

The dummy resize isn't activated until you press 'Apply".

Presumably you are already using a Boot Manager.

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Garry, the "best" method will depend on how things are configured now. Last I knew, you had a 500 GB hard drive that started out all partitioned for Vista:

I believe that you shrank that C partition from the picture above and installed Windows 7 in the space that was made -- is that correct? Anyway, it would help to get an updated capture of that Disk Management screen.

Mikisu, there is no "Documents and Settings" folder in Windows Vista or 7. Also, Windows Vista and 7 come with a boot manager.

Posted 4 years ago
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mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

Really -thanks Scott!
Have W7 installed on the VM-should have known!

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

ScottW, You are correct on the partion created after a Vista partion shrink, to which I installed Win7 on or around 40GB.
I can't seem to get this image thing right, yet. Don't know what I'm doing. Can we skip this or do you need this, Scott?

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Garry, you got it right, and it really helps. The first thing that I see that makes me wonder is that the Vista partition is assigned the volume letter C. You said above that Vista is the default ("D") and Windows 7 is "C". But the new Disk Management screen says the opposite, at least based on the partition labels.

Which OS were you booted into when you took this screen shot? You also said above that you're not really on Win7 yet. What does that mean?

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

ScottW, Was taken in Vista. While posting and stating the Vista D, etc I was in Win7. Wanted to work from 7, but had trouble with getting into Disk Management screen to post...Garry
P.S> Why would that change like that? Is something wrong?

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

No, nothing is wrong. It is working correctly. Windows assigns the volume letter "C" to the partition that contains the operating system. When you boot Vista, the "Vista" partition is C and when you boot Windows 7, the "Windows 7" is C. Post twice in the same thread from a different OS and your volume letters contradict each other! It's kinda funny. :-)

Now, the next thing that is important is to backup your data. There is a small risk with any partition operation that things go terribly wrong and your partitions become inaccessible. Just in case this happens, one should always backup the data. Lost partitions can usually be recovered, but it's much easier to just restore data from a backup. Much, MUCH easier.

If you don't have an external hard drive to backup to, or your data won't fit on a small number of DVDs, you could "backup" the data from one partition to another. For example, you could copy data from "Vista" to "Windows 7" before shrinking "Vista". It's not the best backup scenario, but better than nothing.

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

I have saved all the wanted files onto Vista. Unless there is something hidden within the Win7 partion that may be needed elsewhere, such in the case of a recovery, the partion can be deleted. I don't have an external drive and the partition is about 23GB. I will backup to disks if you find that necessary...Garry

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Important Note: you cannot delete the partition labeled Vista because it is your System partition and contains the Windows boot manager. If the partition is deleted completely, you will get the dreaded "bootmgr is missing" error and Windows won't start.

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

Absolutely we don't want to go there. But I want to keep Vista as the default OS but only give 7 some elbow room. Of nothing of a personal nature on the 7 partion...Garry

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Once your data is backed up to your satisfaction, go ahead and use the Partition Wizard linked by Mikisu, above. I have not used this software myself, but it is the only free partition manager that officially support Windows 7 (and 64-bit Windows).

I expect that you are wanting to shrink "Vista" as small as possible, move "Windows 7" to the left, then expand "Windows 7" to fill the available space.

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

Well, almost. Want to expand Win7 to 100GB, leaving Vista as the default OS. Thought I could delete the partion, put it back into Vista, then shrink it by 100GB to which I'll install Win7 to. Am I too far off base? I never used Partion Wizard either and am a little leary of such due to my past problems. If this is the way to go, then I'll do so. Thanks...Garry

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

I'm not following your steps, especially "put it back into Vista". If you delete the Windows 7 partition, then re-create it, you will either need to reinstall Win7 or restore an image of it from a backup. And from what you say, you don't have a backup image.

I suppose that with the right software, you could boot into Vista, image the Windows 7 partition and store that image in the Vista (C) partition. Delete the Windows 7 partition, shrink the Vista partition until 100 GB of space is free, create a new Win7 partition, then restore the backup image to the new partition.

Doing this kind of operation without a partition manager is possible, but involves a lot of this kind of "juggling" partitions and their data.

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

I'm sorry for any misunderstanding. I meant the space left from the partition deleted (Win7=40GB) to go back to the Vista partion. Then after creating the 100GB partition from shrinking Vista I would use the DVD install of Win7 to install on the new 100GB partion.

This is all new to me. I don't know what happens to the deleted 40GB partition after it's deleted nor how to put it (40GB) back into Vista...Garry

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

No problems, Garry. I was just thinking that partitioning is like buying a car. Most folks only do it every few years, so you never get to be an expert.

Anyway, I understand now what you are saying, but it involves an unnecessary step. To put the 40 GB of space from Win7 back into the Vista partition would involve expanding Vista. Then if your next step is to shrink Vista, there was no need to expand it in the first place.

Since you are planning to reinstall Win7, that makes it a little easier. When you delete the Win7 partition, that part of the drive becomes "Unallocated Space" with a black bar, in place of the blue bar, in the disk map. Unallocated space can be used to create a new partition or expand the partition immediately to the left into that space. What you will want to do, instead, is shrink the Vista partition to create more unallocated space for a total of 100 GB or so. Then you will re-create the Windows 7 partition in that unallocated space and reinstall to it.

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Here are instructions, step-by-step.

1. All data on "Windows 7" partition is backed up or no longer needed.
2. Boot into partition "Vista", which will be "C"
3. Launch Disk Management.
4. Right-click on the "Windows 7" partition, and select "Delete Volume..."
5. Where the partition was, you will now have roughly 40 GB of "Unallocated Space" (black bar)
6. Shrink the Vista partition by 60 GB or so. (This may be the hardest step)
7. You will now have 100 GB or so of "Unallocated Space" to the right of Vista.
8. Put the Windows 7 install DVD in the optical drive.
9. Restart and boot from the Windows 7 DVD, begin the reinstallation process.
10. When asked where to install Windows, choose the 100 GB unallocated space.

Done!

Posted 4 years ago
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baldeguy56
baldeguy56
Posts: 810

Scott, I feel kind of silly asking this, but once Win7 partition is deleted it becomes Unallocated Space of 40GB. Do I then shrink Vista of 60GB and will that automatically be added to the already existing 40GB Unallocated Space? Does all the Unallocated Space go to the same place? Sorry for any more confusion as to my questions, but I am glad your not seeing it from my end (LOL) Garry
P.S. Will have to wait till tomorrow as I just seen the time and have to get up in few hours. Thanks for your ever present patience and for the help.

Posted 4 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

In this case, the 40 and 60 GB of unallocated space will be added together to form one 100 GB of unallocated space. Any *contiguous* unallocated space will automatically be merged. So the answer to the next question is no, the unallocated space is not all sent to the same place. It is possible to have a partition separating unallocated spaces.

Regarding step 6, the note about it possibly being hard is because it involves trying to shrink the currently running OS partition. It comes back to this article that we have discussed before.

Posted 4 years ago
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