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(Solved) - i5 vs. i7

(22 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by LadyFitzgerald
  • Latest reply from ispalten
  • Topic Viewed 1671 times

LadyFitzgerald
Posts: 2232

Other than cost, what is the difference between an i5 CPU and an i7? The computer will not be used for gaming (I'm not a gamer; the only game I play is the old Pinball from XP and that is rarely) although it will be used to run and rip DVDs and BDs for viewing on a TV (32" to 40" max), playing music, storing data (such as mp3s, e-books, photos, documents, ripped movies, etc.), word processing, internet surfing, etc.

Posted 1 year ago
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afuhnk
afuhnk
Posts: 309

i5 is good enough. I know a few people that does all you listed on a i3.

Posted 1 year ago
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vistamike
vistamike
Posts: 10945

LF, I do the above and very much more on this i3, 2.3ghz dual core and 6gb ram without problems.
HDMI to 32" tv is seemless.

Mike

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

The isn't much difference other than some performance improvements and how many cores it appears to be to the computer/OS. Also not much of a cost difference either, less than $100 depending on CPU's.

The money is probably WELL SPENT if one considers future apps and how you might use the computer.

Some links on this :

http://www.tech-vs-tech.com/i5-vs-i7/
http://www.brighthub.com/compu.....48391.aspx
http://www.pcmag.com/article2/.....674,00.asp

It seems most computer stores that are 'big box' tend NOT to carry i7's either, mostly i3's and i5's, or AMD processors.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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drift
drift
Posts: 9

I advise u go for what your pocket can offer but if u can afford a core i7 go for it for future benefits,because all the programs u mentioned can run even on a core i3

Posted 1 year ago
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vistamike
vistamike
Posts: 10945

drift, hi.

The way technology is moving, it is not always pound for pocket.

The future benefits will still be i3 conversant.

One of the reasons I will stay i3 for the moment is because I test a lot of software and it would be pointless to 'invest' especially into i7 for these purposes.

As tech moves on I might invest towards i7 but this i3 will be the staple, running fine, and will attract a reasonable quick return price wise. I do tend to put my machines quickly on the market should I 'upgrade'. At the moment, I'm very happy with this and will be a while yet before even thinking i5 / i7

Mike

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Intel Comparison Side by Side Chart of popular processors
http://www.intel.com/content/w.....chart.html

Make your own Intel Side by Side Comparison Chart for decision making by removing all and adding.
http://www.intel.com/content/w.....ct=desktop

This way NO Augments but just FACTS. :) :)

Rick P.

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Mike, there is a difference though, you have the i3. Going 'up', either via an upgrade or new computer purchase, that is a different decision. Also it is purely a 'two headed monster', price vs. performance. Even an older CPU will handle a lot of things quite well, like browsing or even document creation. If you had to upgrade now due to low performance which would you get?

The original question was what was the difference beside price don't forget. There are differences and basically it is performance. Does the i5 have enough performance to do what is wanted today, sure, assuming a lesser CPU was used before and performance was sufficient. However, saving a few dollars today (less than $100, not sure if this was a CPU upgrade or a new computer purchase?) might mean at sometime in the future the computers performance would not be sufficient to what is wanted then, whereas if the i7 was purchased it might be?

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

See my Intel Links Above for Facts and Decision Making Comparison. :)

Posted 1 year ago
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LadyFitzgerald
Posts: 2232

Ok, let me throw some more fuel on the fire (no, I'm not trolling). Does the i7 run significantly hotter that the i7?

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

The Boxed Intel Heat Sinks are designed to be adquate for normal CPU cooling
according to the Published Intel Processor Specifications.

If you want to Over Clock the "K" Skew CPUs more than published, then you need a cheap Cooler.

I run the i7 with a little bit of O/C at 4.8 GHz.

Rick P.

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

I don't think so, depends on the CPU model. Also how good and which heatsink you use.

My i7 doesn't run that hot as it 'manages' the cores and even the CPU speed. Also, my desktop has variable speed fans. When most of the cores are running up near the top and the Turbo kicks in, the computer can be confused with a HAIR DRYER!

That said, I mostly run near or below 10% CPU usage from all cores.

Cores by the way are really something that the OS has to manage, and in some cases, applications are developed that will take advantage of them as well.

My thought is the more cores the better... the faster the better... the larger the cache the better...

It really comes down to 'the future'. I don't mean tomorrow either, I mean a few years from now... your needs might change and the OS might change and just need more horsepower. Buy it now and you could put off a new purchase later for a year or more.

Are you looking to upgrade or buy a new system? W8 centric? Touch screen?

Rick's links didn't work for me, so I can't tell what the CPU temps are to be, but again, it will vary by core, cache, usage, and the heat sink as well as air flow, which would be better on a desktop than a laptop.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@Irv,

Those are Standard Intel Links to to Intel Website.

I don't understand why you can't go to Intel ????

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Yes, I can go to Intel, but your direct links didn't work. I also use FireFox and suspect that site doesn't work too well with it. In any event, the airflow and heatsinks would have more of an effect that the possible temps the CPU could withstand. Even usage and percent used of the CPU would have to be factored in. Unless there was some limiting factor that the power or heat the CPU would need to be able to dissipate, the term "running hotter" doesn't compute.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Think LF is asking about i7 & i5 CPU (TDP).

Depends on the product skew.

Both core i7-3770K and comparable core i5-3570K have TDP of 77 watts as listed by Intel.

(TDP)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_Design_Power

Posted 1 year ago
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LadyFitzgerald
Posts: 2232

@ Irv. The links worked for me (both went to the same place, though). Yeah, I know, that doesn't help you much but I just wanted to point out they are working for others.

I'm not especially worried about future OSes (spelling?). I have no plans for using Win 8 unless Micro$not changes their tune on it in a future update (I'm not holding my breath; same for Win 9). Win 7 meets my needs and will be around until Jan, 2020 which would be a pretty good lifespan for a computer.

@ Rick. Yes, those are the two I am comparing. I chose them based on their popularity on NewEgg (granted, not the best criteria but I don't know enough to base it on anything else). I'm also aware the K means they are overclockable (to oversimplify it, I'm sure); even though I don't plan on overclocking now, I want to keep my options open.

The reason I asked about whether the i7 ran hotter or not is, even though the stock heatsinks will cool both to the same temperature, if the i7 ran hotter, it would have to transfer more heat into the air inside the case to keep the temperature the same as the i5 which might tax the cooling system (I don't especially want the case sounding like a B-17 revving up for takeoff. If both draw 77 watts, then there probably isn't a significant difference.

I'm still weighing the differences.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@LF,

Purchase the i7-3770K.

A UEFI Bios gives you a 100 parameters to set up the CPU.

Unless you have experienced a UEFI Bios like on a Asus MB, then you don't understand what I mean. (lol) :)

EDIT:

A Good Cooler is almost silent !

Accepted Answer · Posted 1 year ago
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LadyFitzgerald
Posts: 2232

The fan noise I was referring to would have been from case fans. They need to push and pull any heat the CPU cooler throws off out of the case. Apparently that won't be any different between the two.

One of my programs, Finale (a professional music notation program that replaces engraving), doesn't play well with hyperthreading, which the i7 supports. Can that be turned off just for one program or does it get turned off for all or none?

The only other significant difference I'm seeing when comparing the two on the link you provided is the number of threads without hyperthreading (33% more). How does that translate in to real life?

Posted 1 year ago
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ispalten
ispalten
Posts: 6259

Hyperthreading is on unless your BIOS can turn it off. Don't think a program can? The OS uses it if available, and a program can if coded properly. Very few are?

I didn't find any links on a web search about Finale and Hyperthreading?

More threads, the more the CPU can do at the same time, well 'do' is a misnomer. Depending on how a program/OS is written it can start a thread and wait for completion. Doesn't mean the CPU will do more or any faster, but once a tread is started in a program it can continue. Can't start a tread, it waits until it can. Over simplified answer, but it allows the computer to work faster. Once you've used all the possible threads up, the program will wait until it can start one. Unless you are doing many things at one time, compiling, downloading, calculating a large spreadsheet, authoring a video, and surfing, you might never hit the limit.

Again, the i7 is a better 'future' purchase as more programs might support hyperthreading, which is using multi-cores.

Irv S.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

A UEFI Bios can Enable or Disable hyperthreading, control how the cores are used plus control how much current and voltage the CPU uses, etc, etc, etc......

Good Case Fans are almost Silent.

@LF, you are wasting everyone's time on this topic AND mean that NICELY. :) :)

Building a machine is not a life altering experience for heaven's sake. (lol) :)

Rick P.

Posted 1 year ago
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