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I guess I should start with choosing a MOBO

(16 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by drpepper
  • Latest reply from drpepper
  • Topic Viewed 637 times

drpepper
Posts: 19

I want to build a desktop test computer. Gaming is of no interest to me. When it comes to reading specs and understanding compatibility, I am lost. Here is my desired use of the test machine.

I intend to use virtualization for testing/learning purposes. (All OS choices will be 64-bit versions.) Windows 7 Professional is to be the host OS. Using VirtualBox I wish to run these guest OSs: Windows Server 2012, Windows 8 Pro, Windows 7 (probably HP and Pro), Windows XP Pro, and Ubuntu (v.10.x or v.12.x) all in a virtual network. Memory requirements indicate the need for 16GB RAM, processor speed/power requirements indicate i5 or i7 as a reasonable choice, and I wish to run multiple monitors for running the entire virtual network (all OSs running simultaneously in th VM). Optionally, I can limit the number of OSs running simultaneously in the VM to require a maximum of 8GB RAM.

I am working within the confines of a budget, <$1000. All the OSs are available to me for free via Dream Spark. So, here is the bottom line. I need suggestions for how to compare MOBOs which are essentially the same except for memory (8GB vs 16GB support) which will support my processor choice side-by-side and compare prices. The price difference may determine the rest of the build for me.

What are the key specs I need to understand, and what is the easiest way to filter my choices?

Thanks for your advice.

drpepper

Posted 1 year ago
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ronniesonora
Posts: 919

drpepper, you might start with this http://www.newegg.com/product/.....icleId=194
If you need more help let us know.

Posted 1 year ago
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drpepper
Posts: 19

I'll take a little time to read up on that. If anyone else has more suggestions, feel free to offer them.

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Here are a couple of nice board options for an i7 or i5 Ivy Bridge CPU (or other 1155 sockets)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....6813157296
http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....6813157295

Posted 1 year ago
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ronniesonora
Posts: 919

I agree with whs on his post. I used the Extreme6 mobo on my build and I'm very happy with it.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

The new Intel LGA 1150 Haswell CPUs and mother boards are just Two Months away from being released.

If you make a Build now, you are Building an Out-Dated Machine for sure !!

Long Article concerning Haswell Architecture.

http://www.realworldtech.com/haswell-cpu/

Rick P.

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Hmm, nice new features in Haswell. I think, this one I really need :"AVX2 brings integer SIMD to 256-bit vectors". LOL

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@whs,

I can't post content because it is Copy Righted but this will explain it better for you.

http://www.agner.org/optimize/vectorclass.pdf

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Thanks Rick. You are really doing something for my education. Do you understand all that stuff ??

Posted 1 year ago
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drpepper
Posts: 19

Thanks for all the info. One of the things I had overlooked in MOBO comparisons was the socket type for the CPU of choice.

When it comes to Sandybridge, Haswell, and other architectures, I am really lost in how this relates to me in performance for my intended use. What are the essential things for me to understand?

Other than high powered graphics cards, are my requirements similar to a gaming system? (To prevent posting my intended use again, I refer back to my first post in this thread for details.)

drpepper

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Since you are no gamer, the Intel 4000 graphics chipset that comes with (some) i5 and i7 will be plenty for your use. And as you have discovered, the socket (pins) is the first criterion that you have to watch. But all SandyBridge and Ivy Bridge come in 1155.

I would not wait for Haswell. We have seen Intel to deliver faulty CPUs with the first batch and it would be a lot safer to go with the proven Ivy Bridge. The performance difference to Haswell is probably insignificant for your applications. If you start with this combo, you will get a fine system:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....6819116502
http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....6813157295

Posted 1 year ago
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ronniesonora
Posts: 919

drpepper, if you go with the Ivy Bridge cpu, I would use this memory. It has a timing of 9-9-9-24 which is the default for Intel. And later, if you decide to up grade
the memory just put in two more. http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....6820233299

Posted 1 year ago
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drpepper
Posts: 19

whs,
I see that both of your recommendations will support a maximum of 32GB memory. That should leave room for future upgrades if desired.

ronniesonora,
There are two of the specs which I would like to have explained:

Timing 9-9-9-24 -- I have seen these specs on a number of occasions. I am not sure how important these numbers are for my application. How do I use these numbers when making decisions?

Cas Latency 9 -- My basic understanding of latency is that it is the time required to retrieve data, and a smaller number represents faster speed. What numbers represent good, fair, poor, etc.?

for either of you,
Given the choice of DDR3-1333 and DDR3-1600 memory -- Does 1600 indicate a faster speed than 1333?

Posted 1 year ago
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ronniesonora
Posts: 919

drpepper, check this http://www.newegg.com/product/.....icleId=276
Yes, 1600 is faster

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Yes, DDR 1600 is faster than DDR 1333. But you also have to watch the latency, especially the CAS latency (first number). If that is much higher, the DDR1600 may not buy you much.

Posted 1 year ago
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drpepper
Posts: 19

Thanks for all the links. A little more time spent in research rewarded me with an article which filled in the rest of the gaps about timing in an easy to read form. I thought it might be nice to share the link as a thank you for all your help.

Understanding RAM Timings

Posted 1 year ago
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