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How to Triple Boot Win 7 / 8 / Linux Mint 14

(35 posts)
  • Started 1 year ago by archp2008
  • Latest reply from presence1960
  • Topic Viewed 3910 times

archp2008
Posts: 1

I currently have Windows 7 and Windows 8 on adjacent partitions on my notebook 750gb hard drive. I have also created a dvd with Linux Mint 14 (Mate) on it which seems to be working ok. I have created a third 10 gb partition which I hope to use for the Linux Mint 14. That partition is presently formatted to NTFS using Easeus Partition Maker 9. I didn't check to see if ext formatting is an option. Can someone please spell out or point me to step by step instructions that I need to follow from here. In particular I am vague in my mind about the manual partitioning requirements when I go to that option in the installation of the Linux Mint. Do I need to manually create several partitions, e.g. boot, swap, etc.? What can I expect the booting options to look like after the installation. Should I setup the booting for Win 7 and Win8 with EasyBCD at first? At the moment I am getting the graphics dual boot screen that was automatically created when I installed Windows 8. I would really like to have this to work the first try. Thanks in advance for any comments and/or suggestions for avoiding a mess.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Is the machine using an EFI Bios ??

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

DON'T DO IT. You are going to get yourself into an awful mess. Install Mint into a virtual partition with VMware. That is A LOT easier and more flexible. (watch the demo in the second link)

Here is a tutorial I made for Installing Zorin (another Ubuntu derivetive) and I used the same method to install Mint. Do yourself a favor and proceed that way.

Btw: Since I have Mint and Zorin I can compare. Zorin is a lot nicer and easier to use for a Windows person. Have a look here.

PS: You don't need any partition. The VMware installation will be a folder in your Documents (or wherever you choose). You only need 10 to 20GB of space on your C partition (initially you need about 6GB but it will probably grow).

Posted 1 year ago
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hArLtRoN
Posts: 766

I wouldn't install a Linux OS on the same disk as ANY Windows installation. Linux installs GRUB bootloader and I personally hate it. Use whs's suggestion with the virtual machine. Make sure you have enough RAM for the virtual machine AND your host machine to run.

I made the mistake (in my opinion) a few years ago of installing Ubuntu 10 (I think that was the version) and Windows 7 on my PC. GRUB was extremely hard to get rid of and was just a nightmare.

Keep in mind some of what I said is personal bias because of my experience with dual booting Windows 7 and Ubuntu. It may be different for you.

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

" I wouldn't install a Linux OS on the same partition as ANY Windows installation "

I think you meant THE SAME DISK - not partition.

PS: Regarding RAM - Linux runs well in 1GB, even 512MB. But I give it always 2GB and 2 CPU cores because I have 8GB and 8 cores.

Posted 1 year ago
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hArLtRoN
Posts: 766

Oops. Yes I meant SAME DISK. Thanks for catching that! :)

I edited my original post so it is now correct.

Posted 1 year ago
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presence1960
Posts: 280

Why are people afraid to have someone install linux as a full installation to hard disk? is it because of inexperience? I have been holding my tongue for a long time but can not any longer. Linux like any other OS is made to be installed on a hard disk. PERIOD. Virtualizatuion is a viable option, but to sit here and say not to install linux on a hard disk is really crazy!

GRUB is so easy to get rid of, if you know how. If you don't know how ask someone who does. Isn't that how you all learned Windows?

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@whs

I need a link to your AIK version of Marcium imaging ISO. Search doesn't work anymore.

Thanks,

@presence1960,

It only becomes a problem if OP doesn't understand UEFI Bios, Windows 8 and Dual booting Linux issues.

Rick P.

Posted 1 year ago
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hArLtRoN
Posts: 766

@Rick,
I think this is what you want.

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

Rick, here it is. I just updated it to the latest Macrium version.

https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=475a0a48ca6d4035&provision=1&ref=3&wa=wsignin1.0&sa=412485191#cid=475A0A48CA6D4035&id=475A0A48CA6D4035%211812

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@WHS,

The Update is what I Need. :) :)

You do much for all of us.

Thanks,

Rick P.

Posted 1 year ago
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hArLtRoN
Posts: 766

Rick,
I think so. Its the same link whs posted just after me

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

@ presence1960, that's all nice and dandy what you say. But for a first time Linux user, the virtual way is a LOT easier. I have bailed out many OPs that got stuck with the GRUB and did not know how to get out of it.

It is easy for you to say that a full installation is better - you are a Linux Pro. But give a man that wants to try it out a chance. If you install in VMware, all you have to do to get rid of it is to delete a folder.

The other advantages are that you can copy that folder to an external disk and then run it on any machine (my Zorin and Mint are on an external disk ). And when you operate in VMware with tools, you can communicate easily between the host and the guest and move files and folders both ways with a simple Copy/Paste.

I have tried about a dozen Linux distros ranging from Fedora to DSL (always virtual). Most of them I did not like and the uninstall was 2 clicks. Now I finally found Zorin. I love this distro and do not feel alienated any more. I use it a lot and when I run it in VMware (from my external SSD) I do not notice any difference to running an OS that is installed on the internal disk.

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

Rick, I figured that you needed that for EFI.

PS: I don't do a lot. If the 'facilities' were more user friendly, I would do a lot more.

Posted 1 year ago
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presence1960
Posts: 280

The person should have an image(s) in case anything goes wrong and a working back up of all data. We all should have these anyway no matter what. The only way someone is going to learn is to try. But what really irks me is we are making the choice for the person based on our biases. To say "Don't do it!" is totally out of line. I say "either way is viable it is the persons choice". I specifically joined this forum to learn more about windows and haven't been disappointed. However versed we are in any oS is beside the point because we all were noobs at the beginning and had to learn in steps through trial and error. Don't deprive others of their learning curve. As one of my fav sayings goes "Rome wasn't built in a day". Rome started out with two people Romulus and Remus. Very unassuming and very lacking in anything. Eventually Rome ruled half the known world. Allow people to make their paths all the time being there to help. You know why I know a little about linux? Because I got my hands dirty and made plenty of mistakes. But the other ubuntu forum members were there to help me. That's how I learned.

Nothing is foolproof even virtualization. Someone will find a way to foul that up too or a weird error can occur. No software is immune from that.

P.S. I just want you to know this is in no way personal. I really like HTG. whs I have that pdf you posted on skydrive with all your video tutorials. I like most of them they are great. I just don't believe we should be steering people away from installing linux on a hard disk because we couldn't do it successfully. many, many people do it everyday and it is not hard as you say it is.

Aperson wanting to do this should really read about dual booting and GRUB before creating the Live CD/USB and attempting the install. Linux is not hard, it is just different than windows. The installation process is totally as far as you can get from a windows install. If someone expects linux to be like windows, then there is no need to install linux if they already have windows. Let the people decide which way to install. Then we will be there to help if needed. That's how they will learn, just as we learned.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@Bob,

I think you misinterpret what advice is given.

Remember most Responders run large multi-disk or multi-SSD Builder machines.

Personality, I would never advise anyone to dual boot any one disk OEM Laptop or such.

OEM machines just don't have the capabilities of Builder machines so OPs get into problems quickly.

Dual Booting is sorta-kinda Tacky Computing on a shoe string budget machine.

Posted 1 year ago
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presence1960
Posts: 280

@ Rick-I understand that. It is possible, but must be researched and planned out on OEMs. Dells in particular are problematic with their useless utility partition and the System Reserved. You have to blow the utility partition out, shrink windows using disk management then install linux. Of course after you have imaged your disk.That's where imaging comes in, in case of mishap. Some OEMs already have 4 primary partitions on a BIOS mbr disk
based machine. I am dual booting a Toshiba Satellite with one disk. Never had a problem with it and my 10 year old daughter uses it a great deal. Hasn't fouled up with a 10 year old using it. And yes she uses linux too, as well as windows 7 & 8, and OSX.

Certain cases absolutely may not be good to do. But I am not commenting based on this thread only. There are plenty of people besides myself who are versed in getting OEMs to dual boot, you know where you can find them, on that other forum.

In my experience I have never had a machine other than a Vaio that I couldn't set up a dual boot with GRUB on MBR.

Posted 1 year ago
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presence1960
Posts: 280

Now that we have had a discussion did we ask the OP what method he prefers to use to install Mint? Seems other than his linux partition being formatted as NTFS, which he can change when he does install, he is pretty well set up partition wise. I would still like to see the partition table. Boot from the Live DVD and when desktop loads open a terminal and run sudo fdisk -l ....that is a dask and lowercase L at end of that command

Posted 1 year ago
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whs
Posts: 17584

BTW: Dell is one of the few OEMs that does not have a System Partition. They put the bootmgr into the Recovery Partition.

And don't worry about ther OP. He may not come back - 80% of the first time posters do not come back.

Posted 1 year ago
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raphoenix
Posts: 14920

(LOL) :) The OP has to answer my FIRST posting in the topic thread before we can proceed.

Also I failed to mention that many young OPs on HTG do not have Parents who are knowledgeable about computing so they don't have the help at home if we Responders by chance mess up their computers with good intentioned advice.

Posted 1 year ago
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