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Hearing trouble

(15 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by elpaelpa
  • Latest reply from LH
  • Topic Viewed 753 times

elpaelpa
elpaelpa
Posts: 717

I've lost alot of my hearing (job related) and just purchased a sound system ,5.1,hoping to hear the tv better.No dice.What I'd like to know is, can I patch a second speaker onto the front speaker and run it back to where I sit without damaging something.I have extra speakers of the same ohms made by the same manu.,or maybe someone has a better idea.I know ScottW is good on this stuff.Thanks.Tom

Posted 5 years ago
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elpaelpa
elpaelpa
Posts: 717

As a follow-up to my question.Putting the center channel speaker next to me works great except it ruins it for others!If it's impossible to tap into the center channel,run two speakers off the center channel, does anyone know anything about these wireless additional speakers that were mentioned when I Googled?Thanks.Tom

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

Hi elpaelpa. Which is easiest for you to hear, bass, middle, or high ?

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Don't forget this when splicing or adding into systems.
Going to take a bit of calculations and few inexpensive parts from Radio Shack.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impedance_matching
Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

You stalkin' me Rick ? :)

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

@LH
NO !!!!
Just a few of us on-line at the moment and not many questions I have a solution for.
Would you like me to stalk you ?? :) :)
DSL is is intermittent anyway so probably will lose connection shortly.
Best Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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elpaelpa
elpaelpa
Posts: 717

Hello gentlemen!Merry Christmas!Anything in the speech range!I've played with the settings (both tone and soundfield)and anyone verbalizing sounds like they're talking through their nose and worse.Makes it very uncomfortable for my wife with the volume cranked up and for me to watch anything with the sound normal is useless.CC is annoying/confusing as it usually can't keep up with the dialog.I'm going to check out Rick's post and get back.Thanks. Tom

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

Yes, Ricks link is very important, but, may not apply depending on the frequences involved and the decibals demanded.

Posted 5 years ago
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elpaelpa
elpaelpa
Posts: 717

@raphoenix-running the speakers in parallel sounds a little dicey.Splitting the sound between the tv and main sound system and running a second amp might be the answer.(?)

@LH-A separate amp (have one) would allow me to adjust the sound at my location without bothering wifey too much (maybe).Would also allow me to try head phones.

What do you think? Can the sound be split there? Any thoughts\ideas would be appreciated!Thanks.Tom

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Tom,
As I indicated; think just splicing speakers into an unknown sound system would (not) be good.
Being an old engineer, I tend to "complex" almost all questions.
Best to take the advice of others for more practical solutions.
Happy Holidays to You and Yours,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Tom,
After further reading, I see I may even be wrong about splicing and adding speakers into your sound system so For Sure Take Other's Advice !!!! :) :)
-------------------------------------------
Quote
Loudspeaker amplifiers
Modern solid state audio amplifiers do not use matched impedances, contrary to myth. The driver amplifier has a low output impedance, such as < 0.1 ohm, and the loudspeaker usually has an input impedance of 4, 8, or 16 ohms, which is many times larger than the former. This type of connection is impedance bridging, and it provides better damping of the loudspeaker cone to minimize distortion.

The myth comes from tube audio amplifiers, which required impedance matching for proper, reliable operation. Most of these had output transformer taps to approximately match the amplifier output to typical loudspeaker impedances.
Unquote
Not sure why or how the above works but the article says it does. Told you I was old. (LOL) (LOL) (LOL)
Again; Happy Holidays to You and Yours,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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elpaelpa
elpaelpa
Posts: 717

Again,thanks for the help.I'm hoping ScottW sees this topic and respons.He helped on a tv purchase and seems 'up' on this sort of thing.As a former 'jack-knife' engineer,I tend toward improvisation and occasional hasty judgement that can be (mercifully) called poor!Tom

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Hi, Tom! This is quite a puzzle you have posed, especially since it's not just you watching. A 5.1 sound system is good because it pulls the speech to the front center speaker. Since speech is the most important part in understanding the plot, it's important that it come through and not be drowned out by music and sound effects. The amplifier can also help adjust the balance, so you could increase the volume of the center channel and decrease the volume of any channels that tend to drown speech. That's a start.

I think that it would be difficult to create a listening environment that works well for both you and your wife with all speakers. Having someone use headphones is the only way to ensure two separate listening environments that won't interfere with each other. What I'm thinking is for you to have a set of headphones that carry just the speech. The speakers in the room could then be adjusted to a "normal" listening mode. Since some of the ambient sound will reach your ears even through headphones, this system still works. Speech from the speakers that reaches your ears will just reinforce the speech you are already getting. Sound effects and music that reach your ears will be dampened by the headphones, but will allow you to hear this part of the audio in a way that won't drown the speech.

So, I would suggest that you hook amp 2 either to the source audio, to a 2nd audio out on amp 1, or to a monitor out on amp 1. Adjust the sound on amp 2 with an equalizer so that it emphasizes the speech and de-emphasizes everything else. Then run headphones for you from amp 2. The speakers will put out a typical listening environment for others, while the speakers + headphones will provide you with a personalized listening environment with the speech having more volume.

Posted 5 years ago
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elpaelpa
elpaelpa
Posts: 717

Hello Scott.Yes, this is puzzling.I'm not sure Your idea will work with what I have.I'm going to give it a shot,though.But,would it be posslble to split the sound before it gets to the new sound system and run the amps totally separate?This could be easily done as Radio Shack sells 'one into two' patch cords.Damaging the tv or new system is what I'm concerned about.I would assume the danger would be more acute as volume is increased.(?)The tv has 1 set of sound out jacks and fixed/variable audio out.If I kept the fixed tv sound low and strictly used only the amp controls for volume, wouldn't that lesson the chance of damage? I wont hold you responsible for your answer. :) Thanks and Merry Christmas.Tom

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

ScottW. I was thinking along the lines of running a couple of small piezo speakers. May not be loud enough tho', and would certainly be distracting to anyone else in the room.
Or. modify the system a little, to use remote headphones, without cutting off the main speakers.

Posted 5 years ago
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