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Ghosting approaches - summary because of popular demand

(69 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by whs
  • Latest reply from mikisu
  • Topic Viewed 34131 times

whs
whs
Posts: 17584

The boot sequence is changed in the BIOS (which is so to speak the operating system of the motherboard). It operates completely independent of the operating system and works at all times (unless the hardware is on a blink) - even if there is no OS at all. Imagine you have a brand new piece of hardware with nothing on it. The first thing you do is call the BIOS, set the boot sequence to CD - normally (or USB - in special cases) and load the OS.
I give you another example: I have one system with 2 internal Sata disks. Disk A has Vista and disk B has Windows7. I switch the operating system by changing the boot sequence to either A or B.

PS: I just realize that this was a long answer to a simple question.

Posted 5 years ago
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mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

wmk

re Incremental Backups;

Represents only the changed sectors of the volume since the last full or incremental backup was taken. Each incremental backup image is dependent on all prior incremental backup images and the full backup image related to the backup job. By selecting to mount or restore an incremental backup image, you are incorporating the contents of the full backup image and any prior incremental backup images to create a complete representation of the volume at the point-in-time of the incremental image you are using.

Because incremental backup images only involve the changed sectors, these backup images can be written very fast compared to full or differential backup images.
With Shadow Protect for example,a background incremental may take only seconds

Differential;

Represent the changes relative to another backup image file. Differential backup images can be taken against a full backup image.

A differential backup requires approximately the same amount of time to generate as a full backup image, but will require less space since it only consists of the changed sectors relative to the image file the differential was generated against.

A lot of non commercial users just settle for full backups,as it doesn't normally take long ,takes up little actual space , isn't dependent on all the links in the chain being OK or on amalgamating all the separate images into one to conserve space

re speeds;

An external drive using an usb 2.0 interface will achieve 20-30 Mps(megabytes per second) vs 75-85 Mps for eSATA

re problems;

Acronis users have reported problems when using USB-see their forums.

My problem with eSata was for some unknown reason ,it seemed to be incompatible with Creative software and card,if plugged in continuously,causing hardware interrupts.
I now plug in only when required and copy the backup image there,rather than backup direct.

My main backup archives are the different separate internal partitions

You may have no problems whatsoever with either and eSata should not have any problems normally at all-so dont be put off!

However,I would recommend using eSata.

re AHCI;

AHCI is the acronym for the Advanced Host Controller Interface. It enables advanced SATA features like Native Command Queuing (NCQ) and hot-plugging. Unless it is specifically enabled, the SATA controller will run in IDE emulation mode.

With Hot Plugging eSATA can be activated anytime,but in IDE mode only at computer boot up.

If its not a selectable mode on your computer,it indicates that the required Intel software isnt present.

Difficult to install and not really required.

Posted 5 years ago
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wmk
wmk
Posts: 35

Just for argument's sake, since the BIOS goes through a preconfigured list of devices until it finds one that is bootable, why need a change in the boot sequence for a bootable CD? My previous IBM desktop's default sequence was floppy to CD to hard disk.

Posted 5 years ago
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mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

My BIOS is set to boot as your example and you are correct, the computer doesn't need a change from this boot sequence normally.

This setting saves a lot of time.

But obviously if you set the Hard disk as the first,then you wont be able to boot from the other options until reset.

Posted 5 years ago
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wmk
wmk
Posts: 35

So I could set my laptop to boot from CD followed by hard disk and leave it at that, then I can boot from the CD anytime when needed to.

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

I guess you could. But it increases your normal (from HDD) boot time. The BIOS will always check the CD reader first - and that takes time. I would set the HDD first. It is even worse if there is still a floppy on top. Who has a floppy in this day and age. That is a complete waste of boot time.

Posted 5 years ago
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wmk
wmk
Posts: 35

My laptop came with recovery CDs and an Acronis CD that is labelled bootable CD. My internal HDD is partitioned into 2.

If I did a system backup to an external HDD, can I just use the Acronis CD to boot and the external HDD to recover my system settings, etc., including the partitioning in the event of a crash?

Posted 5 years ago
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whs
whs
Posts: 17584

If you backup your system with Acronis and you need to reset your system to an Acronis recovery point, you boot the Acronis CD from the CD reader. That will load a wizard (and a minimal operating environment). You just follow the wizard to recover from an Acronis recovery point of your choice. The recovered system will then look exactly the same as it was at the time the recovery point was taken.
The recovery CD that came with your system does not play any role in this operation. That is for reinstalling or correcting a defunct system.

Posted 5 years ago
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mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

Yes you could!

Boot time for the HDD, if set CD then HDD,in my experience is only minimally more than if set HDD first,if at all.

If this is not the case,the computer needs more power,but test it out yourself.

Much more convenient!

Cant remember the circumstances,but its also a safeguard in case the BIOS cant be accessed and if you have to use a recovery CD.

The Acronis bootable CD allows all the options,such as backup and restore

Floppys are still used for specialised apps-like boot managers etcetc.,but not normally required.

Posted 5 years ago
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