SEARCH

The How-To Geek Forums Have Migrated to Discourse

How-To Geek Forums / Geek Stuff

Ghosting approaches - summary because of popular demand

(69 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by whs
  • Latest reply from mikisu
  • Topic Viewed 34131 times

whs
whs
Posts: 17584

LH, 2 for power I have not yet seen - do you have one of those?

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
LH
LH
Posts: 20002

Yes. 1 is used for data and power. The other used for just the extra power needed.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
whs
whs
Posts: 17584

OK, understand. So there are 2 in total, not 3. Maybe mine uses the first one for power too. I never really checked that. Just assumed that the second one was power.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
LH
LH
Posts: 20002

You will have to build yourself a breakout box. And have the current meter handy :)

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
whs
whs
Posts: 17584

To tell you the truth, I am not that curious.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
Sly
Sly
Posts: 4

I use Acronis True Image and I love it! You should try. (buffalo TeraStation)

Sly
edit by mod, strike 2
We welcome your comments, not your blog spam.

Posted 5 years ago
Top
 
rroberto18
Posts: 25

Read all of the above,, looking for one solution to the aforementioned goals #1 thru 4.

Seems nothing free will.

So is the choice limited to Acronis vs Ghost vs Maxtor 1-Touch?

a) I am not crazy about Maxtor 1-Touch as I've had two of them that died after 2-3 months.

b) I also have had very bad experiences with many Symantec products (and their support) including an earlier version of Ghost. Has Symantec truly gone back to the old Norton days of dependable product & support? If so, I'll try Ghost again...but which version?

Or should I go with Acronis? Which version?

And in the meantime, how does one make a boot disk that can simply reboot ? I didn't see instructions here detailed enough for me other than to follow directions of your ISO-making application when you get one.

There's a lot here so please forgive me if I overlooked something.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
whs
whs
Posts: 17584

It is, of course, not only a question of Ghost or Acronis. If you follow the links you will see a lot of others. I happen to use Ghost and Maxtor One Touch (with no problems at all). For Ghost I would recommend V12 because they are available for little money on the web. The latest V14 has additional function that you would probably never use (but check it out). But I am not an agent of Symantec and encourage you to check the other options too. I just cannot add too much personal logic to them because I never used them - just know some things from hearsay.
Regarding the boot disk I always recommend to buy the boxed version because it comes with the boot disk (and so does Maxtor One Touch). If you download any of the programs, you have to study the product information for guidance on how to burn the disk. It is different for every product.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

The term Ghosting really isnt in common usage for any software other than Norton Ghost.

"Disk Imaging" or "Disk Backup" is more appropriate,as opposed to disk copying which is cloning or data copying only.

There are quite a few disk imaging applications and a review HERE.

Have tried most and my choice without question, is ShadowProtect available for a full evaluation HERE.

Shadow Protect generally has superior speed, industrial strength reliability and some unique features.

Would not recommend Acronis because of reliability problems for some,including me.

If you have a laptop you are forced to use an external drive to store your backup images,but you can choose any make or size HDD you like.

Buy a HDD enclosure and fit any disk of your choice-its simple to do and usually cheaper than buying a package.

I am using an Antec fan cooled enclosure with a Seagate 500gb drive.

If you have a desktop,you are better off using a second HDD internally for image storage.

The connection to an external drive is either by USB or by eSATA cable..

For a start USB is going to result in slower backup speeds and in both cases there can be problems.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

This seems to be the thread that will never end since the features of these programs keep changing.

New on the scene with a free app is Easeus Todo Backup. It supports 64-bit Windows, comes with a rescue CD, supports backup to CD/DVD, can mount image files as virtual drives, BUT sadly lacks the ability to do incremental backups.

One other very noteworthy feature of Todo Backup is that they provide a BartPE plugin that allows you to create a bootable Windows PE-based rescue CD that can also do backups! As far as I know, none of the other free backup solutions provide assistance or support in making a WinPE-based backup disc. In addition, Easeus says that this BartPE disc with Todo Backup is not just a *recovery* disc but can be used to make backups! This is a very nice feature that is missing from some commercial packages (Norton Ghost dropped the ability to make backups from the bootable media a while back and it is sorely missed).

BTW, be careful about making backups of an internal drive to another internal drive. This is an all-your-eggs-in-one-basket solution where the original data and the backup can both be lost at the same time. It does provide protection from a failure of the primary hard drive, but not against a catastrophic loss of the system, such as theft, fire, lightning, or blunt force trauma. The farther away the backup data is, the safer it is. An external drive is better than an internal, but could still burn up in the same fire. An offsite backup, in a different building or stored online, is better yet.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

Scott

Dont agree with the you at all

It certainly is not eggs in one basket,the chances of two disks destructing at the same time are very small indeed.

Whats blunt force trauma-a hippo falling on it?

Its like insurance-if you are a belt and braces type, you no doubt will insure against a giraffe falling from the sky and injuring you.!

Can't see any logic whatsoever to your strange statement that "The farther away the backup data is, the safer it is".

Its actually worse because the connections aren't as efficient as the internal ones,certainly with USB and in my case- had problems downloading and restoring with it.

Therefore the dangers of a corrupted restore are greater.

It still is going to be stolen (unless you take it with you ),burn in case of fire and if connected to the computer,be damaged if the other disks are going to be damaged.

The problem with externals in my experience is that they are either connected using USB,which is very slow compared to SATA,or problems may exist as when using Acronis .
In the case of eSATA,there are the occasional incompatibilities with other most unlikely apps. and unless AHCI is the chosen mode will only start on reboot.

Compared to internals,they also have size limitations and are not cooled as well.

In case of burglary to use your sort of unlikely scenario,an external may be the first thing to go ,before the computer itself.

Lets not get pedantic here-if a fire happened within the computer (which Ive never heard of)and no one was present,in all probability the external would also be destroyed.

But no doubt the majority of users are happy with externals.

You are saying that the long accepted practice of a spare internal disk for backups is wrong.

Re TODO check its Forum-there are problems with faulty disk sectors,but all in all its good.

I have used it quite a bit and for freeware has great potential,but probably would classify the current version as a Beta.

In any case, if you are prepared to pay,there are certainly better alternatives

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

No need to clutter this thread with a tangential discussion. Starting a new thread titled "backup data to internal or external location?"

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

The gist is here already.

One issue with your recommendation of an offsite backup;

Many if not most restores are required because the system wont boot,which can indicate a serious problem.

How do you then get on the net to retrieve your backup?

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
whs
whs
Posts: 17584

Since this discussion is going into more detail, let me add some own approaches for clarification:

1. An internal Sata is an option for imaging the system. I have done that for a while on one of my systems. Advantage is speed - disadvantage is that it could be corrupted by some smart malware since it is not easy to disconnect it.
2. An eSata is a pretty rare animal. Most external disks are USB2. Those are completely sufficient. The backup takes about 3 times as long as on an internal Sata (40 to 60 minutes for a full image in my case), but that is still not bad as it can run in the background. I only run full images (once a week) - no incrementals. I have dedicated 640GB disks (3.5") to each of my desktops and 250GBs (2.5" One Touch) to the laptops. I disconnect my desktop disks after each backup (with an electric remote switch from Home Depot) - the laptop disks are just disconnected with the USB cable.
3. I have played around with Shadow Protect (I got a license for free). It has quite a different user interface but the incremental backups are extremely fast. I think it was designed with servers in mind where you make incrementals every hour or at least several times per day. It is also the most expensive imaging program ($80 last time I looked)
4. Here is another list of free imaging options: http://www.winvistaclub.com/d75.html

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

WHS,

In current motherboards and systems, eSata is either available in the higher grade mobos, or can easily be added as an add on for budget boards.

Backups and restores take a similar time to using an internal SATA disk-the e represents "external",but is hooked up to the same ports.

Shadow Protect is industrial strength backup-but the desktop version is also for private use.

Once you get used to the layout its extremely simple in my opinion and has some unique features.

The incremental backups in the background are amazing,you dont even know they are being made and may take a matter of seconds,depending how often they are carried out-say every 15 minutes,but can be a lot less,almost continuous!

My backup times for about 5gb is just over 1 minute at up to 86mb a second!

It does cost more than some ,but worth every cent.Its just about 100% reliable.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
mikisu
mikisu
Posts: 337

PS .

Many external HDD cases,such as Antec,Vantec,Coolermaster and others have provision for USB and eSata connections.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
wmk
wmk
Posts: 35

Hello all.

whs, is Kaspersky at odds with Acronis? Boot sequence in the BIOS - do I change it now to enable booting from the optical drive and keep it that way in anticipation of any future crashes? The 2.5 inch and 3.5 inch refer to what?

ScottW, Does Acronis support eSATA hard drive?

Paul, is there any documentation/guide from Acronis about creating a bootable USB flash drive?

Mikisu, what are the problems associated with using both Acronis and external hard disk? I plan to buy an external HD. Apart from 3 USB ports, my laptop also has an express card slot that can accommodate eSATA external HD. What do I have to watch out for re incompatibilities with other most unlikely apps.? and what is AHCI? Is eSATA really better than USB2?

Are deferential backups preferable to incremental ones?

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
whs
whs
Posts: 17584

wmk,

1. I am not aware of any problems running KIS and Acronis together. But I myself do not use Acronis. I run KIS with Ghost on one system without problems.
2. The boot sequence you change the day you want to boot from the CD.
3. 2.5" are the USB powered external disks. 3.5" are the larger external disks that have a transformer for power from the house outlet. For laptops, the 2.5" is usually handier. For a more permanent installation and a desktop, the 3.5" are preferred - they have a lower price per Gigabyte. But in both cases I recommend at least 250GBs.
I myself have dedicated 640GBs for images. But I always make full backups (once per week). I don't trust the incremental/differential (which I think means the same thing) approach.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
wmk
wmk
Posts: 35

whs,

After a crash, can you still change the boot sequence or is it too late?

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 
LH
LH
Posts: 20002

Yes. You can change the boot sequence in the BIOS.

Posted 4 years ago
Top
 



Topic Closed

This topic has been closed to new replies.

Enter Your Email Here to Get Access for Free:

Go check your email!