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Difference in Windows 7 Versions

(12 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by akanealw
  • Latest reply from Shameemsmd
  • Topic Viewed 13972 times

akanealw
Posts: 2

I was wondering if The Geek (or one of his minions) could put together a chart of some kind about the difference in versions of Windows 7. I'm currently running the RC v 7100 Ultimate x64, and was wondering what I would be missing if I opted to pre-order Windows 7 Professional, cause $100 is hard to beat.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

akanealw,
---
Old article but pretty accurate.
Price are NOT current and sku count may change.
http://www.engadget.com/2009/0.....-come-to/2
---
Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Straight from the horse's mouth:
http://windows.microsoft.com/e.....e-editions

Looks like Bitlocker full-drive encryption and the ability to switch languages are the standout features that Ultimate has and Professional doesn't. Branch Cache and Direct Access are features that would be most useful in a corporate environment, not a home.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

If I had the money to pre-order, would personally get Professional Editions.
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MS has traditionally put a [ few more little features ] in it's Business O/Ses but maybe not this time?
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Don't have a need for bitlocker or muli-language as the O/Ses would be on non-mobile / non-laptop in house machines.

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

I *believe*, but cannot confirm, that this list of 7 items are the features that are unique to Windows 7 Enterprise and would theoretically also be in Ultimate.

Based on the available data, it looks to me that the Professional edition would be an excellent way to have the almost-Ultimate and save money. Considering the extra cost and the likelihood of using these extra features, I would say that the Professional edition is the more cost-effective package for the Home Enthusiast user. If you need full-drive encryption, TrueCrypt is free and open-source.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Probably so as I think Windows 7 Enterprise Edition may be (Volume License Only).
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Believe a Volume License still requires a (5) Machine Minimum License.
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Haven't bought a Volume License since 2004 so don't know the cost now but was about $1300-$1500 back then if memory serves me.
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Don't think Windows 7 Enterprise Edition has a discount for Volume License Pre-order but will check.
===========================================
As for as Hard Drive Encryption, I would be very, very scared of the feature at my age because I would want others to have IMMEDIATE FULL ACCESS to my machines in the event something should happen to me.
---
Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

Posted for information 07-01-2009
FAQ: How much will Windows 7 cost you?
http://www.computerworld.com/a.....geNumber=1

Posted 5 years ago
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ScottW
ScottW
Posts: 6609

Rick, interesting article. The pricing is clear as mud! I was especially curious about this part:

The editions marked "Upgrade" are cheaper in every case than the corresponding FPP; the former is the overwhelming choice, since it presupposes an older version of Windows on the PC. (That doesn't prevent you from using an "Upgrade" edition as a first-time install on a PC, or in a virtual machine on, say, a Mac.)

I'm wondering how they know how a Windows 7 Upgrade edition will work since they aren't out yet. And if an Upgrade disc can be used as a first-time install, what would prevent people from using the old Vista trick of upgrading that install without every having a prior version of Windows? I'm confused! :-(

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

ScottW,
---
AGREE. I was confused also by the statement in the article.
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Traditionally the Upgrade Installation would STOP and ask that one put in the Older Genuine CD Product to verify the Upgrade Installation before continuing the install process.
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That's why I initially, in another post, warned against the Upgrade Editions because it might be hard to make slipstream DVDs when Service Packs for Win7 are released down the road.
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The author may have meant that the Upgrade Install will read the Vista Boot Manager file to verify an existing Vista installation and continue the installation on OEM Pre-built machines which just have restore discs.
That would make it a one time Upgrade unless the machine was restored again with Vista then Upgraded again.
For XP, the upgrade installation would have to read the first sector boot table since there is no boot manager. That does not verify the XP installation is genuine so don't know unless it looks for WGA file or registry entries ????
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The FAQ article is confusing !!
---
Regards,
Rick P.

Posted 5 years ago
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JH
Posts: 61

I presume it means that it assumes you have a previous version of Windows, and thus can be used to install, or maybe that it simply asks for a disc, meaning it is possible to have 1 previous Windows licence and upgrade lots of PC's?

Posted 5 years ago
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raphoenix
raphoenix
Posts: 14920

More confusing News
---
Reports: Microsoft will sell Windows 7 'Family Pack'
http://www.computerworld.com/a.....2009-07-02

Posted 5 years ago
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Shameemsmd
Posts: 2

Family pack isnt much useful isnt it!

Posted 5 years ago
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