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(Solved) - Change document , music, etc folders to a different partition

(12 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by Slvrldy17
  • Latest reply from jd2066
  • Topic Viewed 3751 times

Slvrldy17
Posts: 13

I've long been in the habit of setting up my Windows installs with the OS and applications on one partition and have all documents, music, pictures, etc on a separate partition so that I don't lose files if/when the OS goes belly up and a reinstall is necessary. It appears that the methos of doing this has changed in Windows 7 - any ideas on how this can be done? I know how its done in XP and Vista but that does not appear to work in Windows 7.

Posted 5 years ago
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eeeeeeeeek
Posts: 19

I used the same process on vista to accomplish this. I went to c:\users\user profile. I right clicked on each property and moved them to an existing folder of that name on my non os partition. It seemed to work fine, except that it wanted to use MY Music instead of just Music like i tried. However this isn't an issue, if windows is happy using the MY then who am i too complain

Posted 5 years ago
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Slvrldy17
Posts: 13

I'll give that a shot - seems a bit awkward though as in both XP and Vista you right click on the folder ( Documents, Music, Pictures etc), select properties, and in XP (if memory serves) change the target location (drive letter only), in Vista select the location tab in properties and simply change the drive letter. For example C:\users\username\Documents to D:\users\username\Documents and click the MOVE box. This brings up a dialog asking if you wish to move all files to the new location. Since this is after all a Beta release perhaps that feature is yet to be added.

Posted 5 years ago
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Slvrldy17
Posts: 13

Gave it a look and it would appear that Microsoft is busy protecting us from ourselves again. Going to C:\users\user profile and right clicking the folder you want to move brings up the same properties box as in Vista - click on the location tab and the procedure for moving a file to another drive is the same as for Vista. I can live with that -

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

Slvrldy. Using the location tab, is the correct way to do it. Were you looking for something else ?

Posted 5 years ago
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Slvrldy17
Posts: 13

We can mark this one solved - the problem was finding where Microsoft had moved the link to that properties dialog/location box. In previous versions of Windows right clicking on the folder in the start menu got you there - now it is necessary to go to user profiles - like I said, I suspect that MS has changed things to protect users from making the change inadvertently.

Posted 5 years ago
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drifta
drifta
Posts: 446

i did not know this was a possibility. in vista, having 2 hdds i made folders in my non OS hdd and had to manually copy everything every now and then. thanks for letting me on this nice little trick. it will surely save me alot of trouble.

does this mean that if a program saves something to one of the users folder i.e if i downlaod a program from the net and it saves to "my downlaoded files" this files will be automatically moved to the same folder on my non OS hdd?

Posted 5 years ago
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Slvrldy17
Posts: 13

When you move a folder to a different partition, for example "my downloaded files" from the "C" partition to for example the "D" partition and choose the option to have Windows move all of the files at the time you do the change then when saving to "my downloaded files" in the future all files for that folder will save to the new location. This change must be done for each user and yes it is possible to have each users files saved on a separate partition if you wish to do so.

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

Slvrldy, yes. But remember, if D: is just a partition of the drive that also has the C: partition, then, if you have a disk crash, then you loose your data too.

Posted 5 years ago
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Slvrldy17
Posts: 13

True - that's why I back up my data on a regular schedule. My primary reason for setting things up this way is so that if my Windows install gets messed up I can just go ahead and format then reinstall to the C partition without losing my data on the other partitions. I've also had a drive or two fail on me over the years - a good backup is my fallback position in that case.

Posted 5 years ago
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LH
LH
Posts: 20002

We think along the same lines :)

Posted 5 years ago
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jd2066
jd2066
Posts: 3814

One thing to keep in mind about Windows Vista and Windows 7 Beta is that starting with Windows Vista the Known Folder system was introduced.
The Known Folder system is a set of folders that are Known to Windows, whether they are fixed system (Like C:\Windows), fixed per-user (Like C:\Users\[User]), movable (C:\Users\[User]\Documents), movable but not to a network location (Like C:\Users\[User]\AppData\Local) and virtual (Like the "Network Connections" folder in Control Panel).

In Windows XP and lower, there was a system similar to that but it wasn't great. The keys to each folder were in a bunch of different locations in the registry and only "My Documents" had an interface to change the location.

For Windows Vista and Windows 7 you can change any Known Folder that is movable (Or can be redirected as it's called) by using the properties of the folder.
Windows Vista could have a far better system then it currently does to let the user change the paths for Known Folders which is easier then what it has now.
The program Known Folders Browser 1.0.2 uses the Known Folders APIs to get a list of every known folder available and change the paths you change in one easy to use interface for all available folders including the Public folders like "Public Documents", "Recorded TV", etc.

For the Windows 7 Beta, the story is the same only the user folder is more hidden in favor of libraries.
If you go to Folder Options and turn on "Show All Folders" (Or similar) the User folder will return and be displayed in the list view.
You can also change the displayed Desktop Icons and add the user folder to the desktop.
I for one hope Microsoft plans to correct this oversight in the next beta release of Windows 7.

Posted 5 years ago
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