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(Solved) Built computer dies within seconds of powering it on

(15 posts)
  • Started 5 years ago by lloydipp
  • Latest reply from The Geek
  • Topic Viewed 2813 times

lloydipp
Posts: 7

I successfully finished my custom made computer. The problem however, occurs when I turn the computer on; it will power off by itself within seconds. I tried upgrading the power supply from 300 watt to 450 watt thinking that was the problem, but no luck there. The motherboard I am using is a GIGABYTE GA-P35-S3G LGA 775 Intel P35 ATX Intel Motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/Product/.....6813128084) and my power supply is a Power Up 450-Watt ATX 120mm Fan SATA-Ready PCI-E-Ready 24-Pin Power Supply (http://www.tigerdirect.com/app.....No=2475867). Thank you in advance for any help.

Posted 5 years ago
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Budohorseman
Budohorseman
Posts: 847

Are you getting any error (beep) codes during the POST? Is it even getting to the point where it tries to load windows? Also, what type of cooling solution are you using?

Posted 5 years ago
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lloydipp
Posts: 7

No error codes. It gets to the point where it would boot windows; however, windows is not yet installed, due to this problem. The only cooling solution I have are the three fans (the heatsink, the one in the power supply, and the one in the case).

Update: If the ATX_12V Connector is not plugged into the motherboard, the computer will work normally, but I don't have video.

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

So you are able to get into the BIOS settings then?

Posted 5 years ago
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lloydipp
Posts: 7

@The Geek
For a few seconds, yes.

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

Does your cpu heatsink fank come on immediately and run well?

I'd verify that it is installed correctly, and properly mounted on the CPU (sometimes it's difficult to push it down enough so that it'll be tight against the CPU).

When a computer turns off after a small amount of time, I'd suspect an overheating problem forcing it to turn off to be safe. If you can get into the bios, can you get to the screen where the temperatures are?

In some cases, the motherboard detects the CPU incorrectly and sets it to the wrong speed, which will quickly cause overheating and make the machine power off. I'd verify that it's being detected correctly.

You should also check over the board, make absolutely certain that your case wires are connected correctly to the power and reset on the motherboard. I'd start disconnecting other components like the hard drive just to verify as well.

You should look over the motherboard to make sure that there are no blown capacitors (they'd look like the top or sides exploded if so).

Posted 5 years ago
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Budohorseman
Budohorseman
Posts: 847

I was thinking...your board is similar to mine (I have one of Gigabyte's X38 boards) and if I remember correctly, it will automatically shut down if the cup fan shuts down, you may want to check and verify that the fan on your heatsink is plugged in properly. You may also want to make sure that the power to your cpu (the small square one on the upper left of the cpu) is plugged in good...I had a bit of trouble getting that one make a good connection. How much thermal paste did you use when you put the heatsink on your cpu (or are you using the heatsink/fan that came with the cpu)?

Posted 5 years ago
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lloydipp
Posts: 7

The heatsink is now, or at least appears to be, installed correctly. Before I fixed the heatsink, the CPU temperature would go as high as 110 degrees C. Afterwards, It wouldn't go as high; however, I am still worried, because the motherboard, detects the CPU temperature as above the recommended 38 degrees. I am using the heatsink that came with my CPU. I didn't use any thermal paste between the heatsink and CPU; should I try that?

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

So that was the problem then?

The CPU comes with a very small amount of thermal paste on it, but it always seems to scrap off easily if you take the heatsink off more than once. I'd absolutely recommend using some arctic silver (or other) thermal paste on there.

Posted 5 years ago
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Budohorseman
Budohorseman
Posts: 847

the heatsinks that come with the cpu have a thermal compound on them, it should look like a dark gray square on the area that come in contact with the cpu, if it didn't, then you will need to get some. As for the temps, I think the 38 degrees is the case temp, not the cpu temps. Most intel cpus are running around 45-55 C.

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

@Budo

My CPU runs way below that... the quad core and newer CPUs shouldn't be running at 45 except under a large load.

Posted 5 years ago
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Budohorseman
Budohorseman
Posts: 847

well i guess my 20% overclock and running SETI@home, LHC@home, and folding@home may have something to do with that lol.

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

Yeah... that's probably likely!

I'm not a regular overclocker, but I've been considering doing so on my new computer since it runs so cool even under load. Would also make an interesting addition to the series on building a computer (although very tough to write in a generic fashion)

Posted 5 years ago
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Budohorseman
Budohorseman
Posts: 847

So true, specially when it comes to memory timings and voltages...uck...just say for overclocking your system, go to AnandTech.com lol (that's where I go for all my overclocking needs!

Posted 5 years ago
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thegeek
The Geek
Posts: 2059

Couldn't agree more =)

Also, I ask my brother... he's a crazy overclocker.

Posted 5 years ago
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