Lowell Heddings

Lowell Heddings, better known online as the How-To Geek, spends all his free time bringing you fresh geekery on a daily basis. You can follow him on if you'd like.

Barely a month had passed after we told you to let Windows Update automatically keep your PC updated before Microsoft decided to make us look bad by releasing a couple of really bad updates that broke people’s computers. So today we’re going to show you how to roll things back should an update break everything.

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Everybody knows about how smartphones auto-correct your text in funny and unintended ways, but in the latest versions, iOS added a predictive word suggestions bar that helps to guess what you’re typing. The problem is that it’s often wrong, and it takes up screen space. So if you want to disable it we’ve got you covered.

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If you’re using Linux as your desktop operating system, you probably are very aware of what version you are running, but what if you need to connect to somebody’s server and do some work? It’s really useful to know exactly what you are dealing with, and luckily it’s also pretty easy.

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Scanning a document in Mac OS X is extremely simple, but for those who might not be familiar, or are coming from Windows, it’s useful to take a quick tour through how it works.

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There are countless ways to copy files between computers, including great sync options like Dropbox, but if you just want to share one of your folders from your Mac to your Windows computer, you can do that easily.

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We’re going to assume that most How-To Geek writers know how to delete the history, cookies, and cache in Mobile Safari, but just in case you don’t know, here is how to do it.

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One of the great things about Linux is that you can do the same thing hundreds of different ways—even something as simple as generating a random password can be accomplished with dozens of different commands. Here’s 10 ways you can do it.

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Clearing the cache on your iPhone or iPad is really easy, but that will log you out of every single website that you were previously logged into, and wipe any other cookie-based preferences. So what if you want to just wipe cookies or cache for a single site?

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If you’ve got loads of icons cluttering up your desktop, you might want a quick way to turn them off without using the context menu; here’s a quick and easy way to make a shortcut key to turn them on or off.

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Drivers aren’t something that you need to be terribly worried about anymore unless you’re a gamer, but when you are troubleshooting a problem it can be useful to see what you have installed. But who wants to click through every item in Device Manager?

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If somebody keeps spamming your phone with unwanted texts, or calling you when you don’t want it, you might be interested to know that you can easily block contacts from texting, calling, or even trying to FaceTime you in iOS even if they aren’t actually a contact.

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Mobile Safari is a really great browser — it’s fast, easy to use, and has most of the features you might want. What it doesn’t have, however, is a good way to view the source code of a page.

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Ever since I’ve been using my new MacBook Air, I’ve been befuddled by how to do some of the simplest tasks in Mac OS X that I would normally do from my Windows laptop—like show the connection speed for the current Wi-Fi network. So am I using 802.11ac or not?

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There’s nothing more tedious as a system administrator than running security updates on a dozen servers every single day. Luckily Ubuntu will let you automate stable security updates so you’re never at risk.

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If you have a computer at home and there’s nobody else around, there really isn’t any reason to login every single time you need to use it. Luckily you can easily set OS X to login automatically.

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In today’s edition of Stupid Geek Tricks (where we show off little-known tricks to impress your non-geek friends), we’ll learn how to hide data in a text file that can’t be seen by anybody else unless they know the name of the secret compartment.

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Whenever an application wants to make itself accessible over the network, it claims a TCP/IP port, which means that port can’t be used by anything else. So if you need to use an in-use port, how do you tell what application is holding it?

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We’re always on the lookout for the simplest and easiest solution to perform a task, preferably while using the least amount of system resources. Here’s how to minimize to the system tray with a tiny little application helper.

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It’s common knowledge that almost every single geek hates Internet Explorer with a passion, but have you ever wondered why? Let’s take a fair look at the history and where it all began… for posterity, if nothing else.

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If you’ve completely forgotten the Wi-Fi password, you can usually just read it from the sticker on the router provided by your ISP — but what if that isn’t the right one? You can also recover your Wi-Fi password from your Mac.

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The built-in Windows firewall is an important part of your system security, but over time, more and more applications end up being allowed through the firewall. Luckily there’s an easy way to reset all the settings to default again.

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You would think that Microsoft would have learned from their Windows 8 mistakes of forcing terrible features down people’s throats, but it looks like they’ve integrated a positively awful Search button / panel into the Taskbar. Here’s how to hide it using a registry hack.

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The Disk Management tool in Windows gives you an easy-to-use graphical interface to dealing with partitions and drive letters, but what if you want to just quickly change a drive letter on the command prompt? The diskpart utility makes it easy.

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Ever since the first person wrote out 5318008 on a calculator, nerds have been hiding secret numbers inside of your PC, and using them to negotiate secret handshakes between applications and files. Today we take a quick look at some of the more entertaining examples.

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When you hover your mouse pointer over a button in the taskbar, Windows shows you a preview of that window by default, but that preview is usually really small. Luckily with a quick registry hack, we can make those thumbnails bigger.

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