SEARCH

Lori Kaufman

Lori Kaufman is a writer who likes to write geeky how-to articles to help make people's lives easier through the use of technology. She loves watching and reading mysteries and is an avid Doctor Who fan.

ScreenTips in Word are small popup windows that display descriptive text about the command or control your mouse is hovering over. You can also create your own ScreenTips for words, phrases, or images in your own documents.

about 9 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Word likes to use squiggly underlines to indicate something isn’t right in our documents. The more common ones are red (a potential spelling error) and green (a potential grammar error). However, you may have seen blue squiggly lines throughout your document as well.

about 9 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Microsoft Office applications allow you to customize the ribbon by adding commands to the default tabs on the ribbon and creating your own custom tabs, as well as customizing the Quick Access Toolbar. However, you may want to reset the ribbon to the default settings.

about 9 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

The Ribbon in Microsoft Office 2013 provides quick access to many features and options by default, but it can be further customized to fit the way you use it. You can add a custom tab to the ribbon or you can add commands to the existing tabs.

about 9 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

The ribbon in Microsoft Office applications provides access to most major commands and options, but there is another feature that can be very useful if you take the time to customize it. The Quick Access Toolbar provides one-click access to any commands added to it.

about 9 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

The Ribbon in Microsoft Office applications provides an easy way of accessing features, but takes up a lot of space on the screen. If you want to maximize the amount of space you have for your documents, you can easily show and hide the ribbon on demand.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

A drop cap is a decorative element typically used in documents at the start of a section or chapter. It’s a large capital letter at the beginning or a paragraph or text block that has the depth of two or more lines of normal text.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Live hyperlinks in Outlook are opened in the default browser by pressing and holding the “Ctrl” button and clicking the link. This is the default setting, but it can be changed if you would rather single click on a hyperlink to follow it.

about 10 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

By default, live hyperlinks in Word are opened in the default browser by pressing and holding the “Ctrl” button and clicking the link. If you would rather just single click to follow a hyperlink, you can easily disable the “Ctrl+Click” using a setting.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

As you type, Word recognizes certain sets of characters, such as web and UNC (Universal Naming Convention – a network resource) addresses, and automatically converts them to live hyperlinks. However, you may notice that addresses with spaces are not converted correctly.

about 10 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

There is a little known feature that has been available in Word since the DOS days. Suppose you want to move some content from one location in your Word document to another, but you want to preserve something else you copied onto the clipboard.

about 10 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

When inserting images, tables, or equations in Word documents, you can easily add automatically numbered captions to these elements. They can contain consistent labels, such as Equation, Figure, and Table. However, you can add your own custom labels, as well.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

When you first install Word, the default location for saving files is OneDrive. If you would rather save documents on your computer, you can easily change that, although Word also sets a default folder on your computer for saving files, which is normally “My Documents.”

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

If you prefer to use the keyboard rather than the mouse to accomplish tasks in Windows and applications, we have a handy tip that allows you to get a list of the keyboard shortcuts available in Word.

about 10 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

Word includes a setting that allows you to automatically convert straight quotes to smart quotes, or specially curved quotes, as you type. However, there may be times you need straight quotes and you may have to convert some of the quotes in your document.

about 10 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Word includes a very powerful search feature that allows you to find information based on almost every kind of condition. There are special wildcard characters that allow you to search for information based on specific patterns and character sequences.

about 10 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

We previously showed you how to get rid of the “Paste Options” box that displays when you paste text in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint. You can do the same in Outlook, but the procedure is slightly different.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

When you copy text from one place in a Word document to another, Word helpfully displays a “Paste Options” box right at the end of whatever you pasted. This tool allows you to choose what to do regarding the formatting of the text being pasted.

about 10 months ago - by  |  4 Replies

The Track Changes feature in Word is a useful feature for keeping track of the changes you make to a document especially when working collaboratively on a document with others. You may sometimes need to copy the text to another document retaining the tracked changes.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Word contains a little known feature, called the Spike, that allows you to gather blocks of text and/or images from different locations in a Word document and then paste all of that content to another location in that document or into another Word file or other program.

about 10 months ago - by  |  6 Replies

When you type a web or email address in Word, you may notice that the program automatically formats it as a live hyperlink. This is a setting in Word’s AutoFormat feature that is on by default but can be easily turned off.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

Word tries to be helpful by automatically applying formatting to your document based on what you type. One example of this is when Word automatically creates a numbered list for you when you enter some text that Word thinks should be a numbered list.

about 10 months ago - by  |  1 Reply

When you search using the Unity Dash, you may notice online content displaying in your search results. Your search terms are sent to productsearch.ubuntu.com and third parties such as Amazon and Facebook and used to provide you online search results in addition to local results.

about 10 months ago - by  |  2 Replies

Word has a handy feature that automatically formats what you type, as you type it. This includes changing quotes to Smart Quotes, automatically creating bulleted and numbered lists, and creating hyperlinks from web addresses. However, what if you have an existing document you want to automatically format?

about 10 months ago - by  |  3 Replies

If you use a touchpad or trackpad, or if you have arthritis or other problems when using a mouse, you may find it difficult to hold the primary mouse button down and move the mouse at the same time to select text and move items.

about 10 months ago - by  |  6 Replies