• ARTICLES
SEARCH

How-To Geek

What is Color? – TED Talk by Colm Kelleher [Video]

If you have ever wondered about the intricate details of colors and how we see them, then you will definitely enjoy this quick physics-based TED talk given by Colm Kelleher.

What is color? – Colm Kelleher [via Geeks are Sexy]

More Video Goodness about Color

What Color is a Mirror plus Other Awesome Color Facts [Video]

Akemi Iwaya (Asian Angel) is our very own Firefox Fangirl who enjoys working with multiple browsers and loves 'old school' role-playing games. Visit her on Twitter and .

  • Published 01/2/13

Comments (7)

  1. Huh

    But wait! There’s MORE!

    Radio “waves” and even sound waves are also part of the same energy spectrum that light is. Radio and sound are obviously not as fast (high) as light waves, but they too are nothing more than waves in space.

    Of course, if you have very fast waves which are faster than light then you’re getting into the x-ray and gamma ray’s which can also be quite deadly if highly concentrated. But then that’s all just a matter of “radiation” levels since you’re being bombarded by them right now!

    You might also note what a wave “length” is too. As depicted in the video, a wave length is the time it takes for one wave to complete one cycle. Therefore, the shorter the wavelength is the faster the wave is.

    For more, check it out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Atmospheric_electromagnetic_opacity.svg

  2. Physics Aficionado

    >> …even sound waves are also part of the same energy spectrum that light is.

    Sound is mechanically transmitted energy, and will not travel through a vacuum as does electromagnetic energy. It is not part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

    >> …if you have very fast waves which are faster than light then you’re getting into the x-ray and gamma ray’s

    By faster, I presume you mean a faster cycle time, since they have a greater frequency, not a greater speed through whatever medium they transverse.

  3. Physics Aficionado

    >> As depicted in the video, a wave length is the time it takes for one wave to complete one cycle. Therefore, the shorter the wavelength is the faster the wave is.

    I haven’t watched the video yet; I hope that it didn’t say this. The wave length is not “the time it takes for one wave to complete one cycle”, but the distance that it travels while completing one cycle. The wave length is inversely related to the time required to complete the cycle.

  4. Physics Aficionado

    Correction:

    >> The wave length is inversely related to the time required to complete the cycle.

    I stated that incorrectly myself; what you said at first was actually pretty close.

    The wave length is inversely related to the frequency (not the cycle time as I stated), and, while not “the time it takes for one wave to complete one cycle”, it is directly related to the time required to complete the cycle.

    So, “a wave length is proportional to the time it takes for one wave to complete one cycle”.

  5. Ushindi

    Regardless, thanks for this, AA.

  6. Asian Angel

    @Ushindi – You are welcome. ^_^

  7. LadyFitzgerald

    Apparently I’m the only one who couldn’t see the video. All I see is a big, white box with a blue X in the upper left hand corner.

Enter Your Email Here to Get Access for Free:

Go check your email!