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Impact Earth Lets You Simulate Asteroid Impacts

If you’re looking for a little morbid simulation to cap off your Friday afternoon, this interactive asteroid impact simulator makes it easy to the results of asteroid impacts big and small.

The simulator is the result of a collaboration between Purdue University and the Imperial College of London. You can adjust the size, density, impact angle, and impact velocity of the asteroid as well as change the target from water to land. The only feature missing is the ability to select a specific location as the point of impact (if you want to know what a direct strike to Paris would yield, for example, you’ll have to do your own layering).

Once you plug all that information in, you’re treated to a little 3D animation as the simulator crunches the numbers. After it finishes you’ll see a breakdown of a variety of effects including the size of the crater, the energy of the impact, seismic effects, and more. Hit up the link below to take it for a spin.

Impact Earth [via Boing Boing]

Jason Fitzpatrick is warranty-voiding DIYer and all around geek. When he's not documenting mods and hacks he's doing his best to make sure a generation of college students graduate knowing they should put their pants on one leg at a time and go on to greatness, just like Bruce Dickinson. You can follow him on if you'd like.

  • Published 11/16/12

Comments (3)

  1. NSDCars5

    Transient Crater Diameter: 7470000000000 km ( = 4640000000000 miles )
    Transient Crater Depth: 2640000000000 km ( = 1640000000000 miles )
    Final Crater Diameter: 355000000000000 km ( = 220000000000000 miles )
    Final Crater Depth: 7090 km ( = 4400 miles )
    The crater formed is a complex crater.

    Beat that.

  2. insanelyapple

    Dear gods. The cut-scene. It cant be somewhere else? It must be North America? :|

  3. mikmik

    NSDCars5, how many trillions of megatonnage? LOL at the final crater depth. Seeing the transient is 1.6 trillion miles, or >1000 times the distance to the sun, 4400 miles seems a little undervalued! What’d you hit the Earth with, the Moon @ 1000km/sec? :)

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