How-To Geek

From the Tips Box: Free Documentaries, DIY Custom-Fit Headphones, and Nintendo Papercraft

Once a week we round up some of the great tips sent in by readers like you and share them with everyone. This week we’re looking at documentary sites, custom headphones, and Nintendo papercraft.

Top Documentary Films Organizes Free Documentaries

Brian writes in with the following tip:

Video sharing sites and the internet in general have been a real boon to documentaries, but a lot of times (especially with YouTube) they’re spread all over the place and poorly labeled and described. I found Top Documentary Films a few months ago and have really enjoyed it… the site catalogs videos, with great descriptions and useful tags, so you can actually find all the great free documentaries out there. Like for example, this week they’re featuring The Pleasure of Finding Things Out, a Richard Feynman classic.

We’re never one to turn down a good documentary; nice find Brian!

Mold Custom In-Ear for a Perfect Fit

Ron writes in with a custom-headphones tip:

I remember you guys had a great tutorial awhile back about making your own custom in-ear headphones. I found a similar tutorial online that uses a clear material for the ear-bud portion. It looks pretty slick so I figured I’d pass it along. Keep up the good work!

The clear look does look pretty slick; it definitely gives it a store-bought feel.

Whip Up Some Nintendo Papercraft

Becky shares a papercraft tip:

I saw the cool 3D print your favorite video game sprites article you posted the other day. For those of us without 3D printers, there’s a neat collection of Nintendo papercraft online. The site hasn’t been updated in awhile but all the forms are still there for download.

Nintendo papercraft you say? Time to begin building our paper Mushroom kingdom.

Have a tip or trick to share? Shoot us an email at and look for it on the front page.

Jason Fitzpatrick is a warranty-voiding DIYer who spends his days cracking opening cases and wrestling with code so you don't have to. If it can be modded, optimized, repurposed, or torn apart for fun he's interested (and probably already at the workbench taking it apart). You can follow him on if you'd like.

  • Published 09/27/12

Comments (4)

  1. r

    unless one has excellent drivers for in-ear monitors they’ll still sound like crap, just louder.
    It’s not just about a perfect seal. A pro pair costs about $2,000.00

  2. bedlamb

    I have an ear plug from a transister radio I had as a kid. 1960s/70s.
    Works fine.

  3. SoL8

    Those transistor ear plugs may work but their sound quality for music has basically no dynamics.

  4. t3or3tic

    Have you seen ? Amazing website, full of documentaries and lectures.

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