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Download the ‘Achieve Personal Unity – 12.04 Unity Customization Guide’ for Free

Once you have your shiny new Ubuntu 12.04 system set up chances are you will want to customize the Unity UI to better suit your needs. That may seem like a daunting task though if you are new to Unity…and that is where this free 72 page guide comes in.

The guide comes with the following sections:

  • An introduction that helps you decide whether you should customize or not
  • Customization tools (software)
  • Customization scenarios
  • Alternative desktop UI environments such KDE and GNOME Classic

When you visit the blog post linked below, click on the Achieve Personal Unity book cover image to start downloading the guide.

Achieve Personal Unity – 12.04 Customization Guide [via I Love Ubuntu]

More Ubuntu Reference Material Goodness for You

Download the ‘Getting Started with Ubuntu 12.04′ Manual for Free

Download the ‘Unity: Make it Yours – Lenses and Scopes for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS’ Guide for Free

An Introduction-Overview of Unity in Ubuntu 12.04 for Beginners [Video]

Akemi Iwaya (Asian Angel) is our very own Firefox Fangirl who enjoys working with multiple browsers and loves 'old school' role-playing games. Visit her on Twitter and .

  • Published 08/3/12

Comments (2)

  1. Ya Whatever

    You know, someone really needs to write a more comprehensive guide on basic things like how to set up hardware in Ubuntu – not just how to use that pathetic system tool called “Additional Drivers” either.

    This guide is OK, but chances you will be reading it assume you already have a fully functioning Ubuntu system. And just because you can install Ubuntu doesn’t necessarily mean it’s fully functioning or fully capable. IOW, there are more important things to worry about before getting into fluff stuff stuff like this.

    The way I see it, a more advanced user probably already knows about the configuration tools/techniques covered in this guide. Whereas a newbie pretty much needs to have a complete system working right out of the box including video acceleration which is almost never enabled after Ubuntu is installed. I won’t even go into the whole Unity 2D/3D thing or the different possible GNOME desktops. Therefore, a guide like this is almost sure to introduce a whole new level of frustration to a newbie. Either that or it’s not likely to be on the bookshelf of most advanced users.

    Don’t get me wrong! I appreciate the authors efforts. I’m sure someone can use it. It just seems to me that it’s still rather incomplete, is all.

  2. Marcel

    @Ya Whatever
    Like Ubuntu itself, the guide is free. Its not for everyone. I prefer Mint, but many of the Linux releases have similar interfaces.
    Thanks HTG.

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