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Ask HTG: Finding The Right Wireless Channel, Transferring PS3 Content, and Mapping SkyDrive to Your PC

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Once a week we round up some of the reader questions we’ve answered and share the answers with everyone. This week we’re looking at “dead” Wi-Fi channels, how to transfer PS3 content to a new PS3, and how to map your 25GB SkyDrive to your PC.

Can a Wireless Channel Die?

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Dear How-To Geek,

I have a Netgear WGR614v7 router and it’s been operating just fine for years.  All of a sudden, nothing wireless will connect.  After a ton of fiddling, I changed the channel and now it’ll work fine on 1 or 11, but 6 (where it previously was set) no longer works.  Is it possible for one channel to die?

Sincerely,

Wi-Fi Wondering

Dear Wi-Fi Wondering,

Although the router documentation says that the router operates at 2.4Ghz, it’s more accurate to say that Wi-Fi uses a portion of the spectrum around 2.4Ghz. Each channel is essentially a micro-slice of that small spectrum that is allocated for Wi-Fi communications. Channel 1, for example is 2.141 Ghz. Channel 13 is 2.472Ghz. All the other channels fall in between that.

It’s highly unlikely that the radio component of the router is failing to broadcast on Channel 6. More likely something in the environment is causing enough interference on the specific frequency Channel 6 operates on (in this case, on or directly around 2.437Ghz). Channels 1 and 11 are far away enough on the spectrum that whatever is causing the blackout at 6 likely doesn’t reach into the frequency that 1 and 11 are using. 

The chances of anything in your environment causing enough of a disruption to black out all the available channels on your router is very slim, however, so if you find yourself picking from a shrinking pool of channels in the future you may want to consider a firmware upgrade or an outright router replacement. 

If you want to get dig even deeper and check out what’s going on with the 2.4Ghz spectrum in your house, you might want to check out our article on using inSSIDer to scan the in-use channels around you.

How Can I Transfer All My Stuff To My New PS3?

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Dear How-To Geek,

I finally upgraded my old PS3 to the new one… the only problem is that I don’t really understand/know how to get all the “stuff” from the old one to the new one. How do I transfer my games? My data? I’d like to give my old PS3 to a friend but I need to get all my stuff off it first.

Sincerely,

Upgrades for Everyone

Dear Upgrades,

Fortunately for you we have more than a few PlayStation fans on staff. All you need to perform the data swap you want to undertake is your new PS3, your old PS3, an internet connection, and an Ethernet cable. Check out this guide to see how to prep, transfer and wipe your old PS3.

How Can I Map My SkyDrive to My PC?

Dear How-To Geek,

I have a Windows Live SkyDrive. I’d really like to get more use of out it and it seems like mapping it as a network drive would really increase the usefulness of having that much cloud storage. Any tips on how I can pull that one off?

Sincerely,

Mad Mapping

Dear Mad Mapping,

Mapping a cloud drive that large is a pretty tempting proposition as it frees you from using a sync utility and lets regular applications write to your cloud drive. You can approach the problem one of two ways. It is possible to directly mount your SkyDrive but many people report slow speeds transferring files. For a speedier alternative, you might consider using applications like Gladinet Cloud Desktop—we have a full step-by-step guide to setting it up here.


Have a pressing tech question? Shoot us an email at tips@howtogeek.com and we’ll do our best to answer them.

Jason Fitzpatrick is warranty-voiding DIYer and all around geek. When he's not documenting mods and hacks he's doing his best to make sure a generation of college students graduate knowing they should put their pants on one leg at a time and go on to greatness, just like Bruce Dickinson. You can follow him on if you'd like.

  • Published 02/6/12

Comments (2)

  1. UltimatePSV

    Perfect timing on the SkyDrive tip! I was just trying to do exactly that!

  2. Anonymous

    ——————–

    One other thing most people don’t realize or fail to remember when it comes to WiFi is that some older cordless telephones (not cell phones) can interfere with WiFi. So placing a cordless phone base or even the handset near a WiFi device like a router is almost asking for problems.

    ——————–

    I Don’t know what to say about PS3 since I don’t play with consoles any more :-(

    ——————–

    Instead of “using” a sky drive as a mapped drive why not backup a single VHD (virtual hard drive) to the cloud instead? You can mount a VHD in Windows locally and even encrypt the VHD file when it’s not mounted for added security. Then all you need to do is set your backup software to backup the one, albeit large, VHD file to the cloud. Obviously, the downside would be bandwidth so you probably wouldn’t want to do it on an hourly or even daily schedule. But weekly or even monthly might be something to consider. (Personally, I don’t keep data on the cloud since I use other methods.)

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